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Race, class, and the postindustrial city : William Julius Wilson and the promise of sociology / Frank Harold Wilson.

By: Wilson, Frank Harold.
Material type: TextTextSeries: SUNY series, the new inequalities: Publisher: Albany : State University of New York Press, c2004Description: xx, 259 p. ; 23 cm.ISBN: 0791460150 (alk. paper); 9780791460153 (alk. paper); 0791460169 (pbk : alk. paper); 9780791460160 (pbk : alk. paper).Subject(s): Wilson, William J., 1935- | African American sociologists -- Biography | Sociology, Urban -- United States | African Americans -- Social conditions | African Americans -- Economic conditions | Urban poor -- United States | Inner cities -- United States | United States -- Race relations | United States -- Social policyDDC classification: 301/.0973 Other classification: 71.60
Contents:
The shadow behind the act -- Industrialization, urbanization, and the changing class structure of Blacks -- Changing patterns of race and class : the emergence of the new Black middle class and the urban Black underclass -- Demographic and ecological analyses of the changing urban Black population -- The social and moral order of the Black community : social isolation, concentration effects, and disorganization -- The world of the new urban poor : jobless ghettos, fading inner-city families, and the changing significance of race -- William Julius Wilson and the promise of sociology -- The significance of sociological prisms and controversies -- The continuing significance of race and racial prisms in the sociology of William Julius Wilson.
Review: "Race, Class, and the Postindustrial City explores the scholarship of William Julius Wilson, one of the nation's leading sociologists and public intellectuals, and the controversies surrounding his work. In addressing the connection between postindustrial cities and changing race relations, the author, who is not related to William Julius Wilson, shows how Wilson has synthesized competing theories of race relations, urban sociology, and public policy into a refocused liberal analysis of postindustrial America. Combining intellectual biography, the sociology of knowledge, and theoretical analyses of sociological debates relevant to African Americans, this book provides both appraisal and critique ultimately, assessing Wilson's contribution to the sociological canon."--BOOK JACKET.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
HM479 .W55 W55 2004 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001732395

Includes bibliographical references (p. 225-248) and index.

The shadow behind the act -- Industrialization, urbanization, and the changing class structure of Blacks -- Changing patterns of race and class : the emergence of the new Black middle class and the urban Black underclass -- Demographic and ecological analyses of the changing urban Black population -- The social and moral order of the Black community : social isolation, concentration effects, and disorganization -- The world of the new urban poor : jobless ghettos, fading inner-city families, and the changing significance of race -- William Julius Wilson and the promise of sociology -- The significance of sociological prisms and controversies -- The continuing significance of race and racial prisms in the sociology of William Julius Wilson.

"Race, Class, and the Postindustrial City explores the scholarship of William Julius Wilson, one of the nation's leading sociologists and public intellectuals, and the controversies surrounding his work. In addressing the connection between postindustrial cities and changing race relations, the author, who is not related to William Julius Wilson, shows how Wilson has synthesized competing theories of race relations, urban sociology, and public policy into a refocused liberal analysis of postindustrial America. Combining intellectual biography, the sociology of knowledge, and theoretical analyses of sociological debates relevant to African Americans, this book provides both appraisal and critique ultimately, assessing Wilson's contribution to the sociological canon."--BOOK JACKET.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

According to the author, William Julius Wilson is one of the "most important public intellectuals in sociology." Through his ideas and publications on the contemporary plight of African Americans, Wilson has had a major impact on urban scholarship and has influenced public policy in the areas of employment, poverty, residential segregation, and welfare. Wilson's work deserves critical assessment, and this is what Frank Wilson (no relation) sets out to do. After a brief introductory chapter describing Wilson's career from his undergraduate years to his current position at Harvard University, the author (Univ. of Wisconsin at Milwaukee) appraises his scholarship in five thematic chapters: industrialization and urbanization, class structure, demographic and ecological dimensions of urban communities, social isolation/concentration, and the new urban poor. The book concludes with chapters on public policy and the sociological imagination, sociological theory, and the continuing significance of race. Throughout, Wilson's work is set within past and current as well as theoretical and empirical writings on race and the city. Lacking an overarching framework, however, the author fails to bring clarity to Wilson's scholarship. This problem is exacerbated by numerous redundancies and a circuitous writing style that is too frequently opaque. ^BSumming Up: Optional. Graduate and research collections. R. A. Beauregard New School University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>Frank Harold Wilson is Associate Professor of Sociology and Urban Studies at the University of Wisconsin at Milwaukee.</p>

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