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Good Muslim, bad Muslim : America, the Cold War, and the roots of terror / Mahmood Mamdani.

By: Mamdani, Mahmood, 1946-.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Pantheon Books 2004Edition: 1st ed.Description: xii, 304 p. ; 22 cm.ISBN: 0375422854; 9780375422850; 2869781342; 9782869781344; 9782869781382 (Codesria); 2869781385 (Codesria).Subject(s): United States -- Foreign relations -- 1945-1989 | Cold War | United States -- Foreign relations -- Afghanistan | Afghanistan -- Foreign relations -- United States | United States -- Foreign relations -- Developing countries | Developing countries -- Foreign relations -- United States | Islam and politics -- History -- 20th century | Terrorism -- Political aspects -- History -- 20th century | Drug traffic -- Political aspects -- History -- 20th century | September 11 Terrorist Attacks, 2001 -- Causes | Islamic fundamentalism | Religion in politics | International relations | United States | Cold War | Political violence | Afghanistan | History | Overseas itemAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Good Muslim, bad Muslim.DDC classification: 320.5/57 Other classification: 89.58
Contents:
Modernity and violence -- Culture talk, or How not to talk about Islam and politics -- The Cold War after Indochina -- Afghanistan : the high point in the Cold War -- From proxy wars to open aggression -- Beyond impunity and collective punishment.
Summary: "Dispels the idea of 'good' (secular, westernized) and 'bad' (premodern, fanatical) Muslims, pointing out that these judgments refer to political rather than cultural or religious identities ... Argues that political Islam emerged as the result of a modern encounter with Western power, and that the terrorist movement at the center of Islamist politics is an even more recent phenomenon, one that followed America's embrace of proxy war after its defeat in Vietnam"--jacket.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E840 .M346 2004 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001731801
Browsing University of Texas At Tyler Shelves , Shelving location: Stacks - 3rd Floor Close shelf browser
E840 .D4 Revolutionary nonviolence: E840 .K4 To seek a newer world E840 .L435 1994 The cold war : E840 .M346 2004 Good Muslim, bad Muslim : E840 .M5 Report of the county chairman / E840 .N57 The real war / E840 .P37 1983 Perspectives on American foreign policy :

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Modernity and violence -- Culture talk, or How not to talk about Islam and politics -- The Cold War after Indochina -- Afghanistan : the high point in the Cold War -- From proxy wars to open aggression -- Beyond impunity and collective punishment.

"Dispels the idea of 'good' (secular, westernized) and 'bad' (premodern, fanatical) Muslims, pointing out that these judgments refer to political rather than cultural or religious identities ... Argues that political Islam emerged as the result of a modern encounter with Western power, and that the terrorist movement at the center of Islamist politics is an even more recent phenomenon, one that followed America's embrace of proxy war after its defeat in Vietnam"--jacket.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Mamdani (political science and anthropology, Columbia Univ.) challenges the simplistic conception prominent in the Bush administration that the Muslim world can be divided into "good" and "bad" Muslims. The former are modern, Western, secularized; the latter, premodern fanatics. Instead he explains the development of political Islam and its terrorist component not as endemic but as a response to and product of American policy in the late Cold War years. He places particular emphasis on the Reagan administration's backing and support of terrorist movements as agents of proxy wars against the Soviet Union. The long conflict in Afghanistan was the prime theater of such proxy action. The book is sharply critical of Bush administration neoconservative policies that Mamdani characterizes as moralistic campaigns based on a faulty understanding of world realities. Like Imperial Hubris, by Anonymous (2004), Jeffrey Record's Dark Victory (2004), Richard Clarke's Against All Enemies (2004), and Steve Coll's Ghost Wars (CH, Oct'04), the book depicts the Bush administration as misunderstanding al Qaeda and misguided in its war in Iraq. Although Mamdani has much to offer, his volume is more theoretical, eclectic, idiosyncratic, and discursive and thus less accessible for general readers than the books above. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. J. P. Dunn Converse College

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