Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Jefferson Davis, Confederate president / Herman Hattaway and Richard E. Beringer.

By: Hattaway, Herman.
Contributor(s): Beringer, Richard E, 1933-.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Lawrence : University Press of Kansas, c2002Description: xix, 542 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.ISBN: 0700611703 (cloth : alk. paper); 9780700611706 (cloth : alk. paper); 0700612939 (pbk.); 9780700612932 (pbk.).Subject(s): Davis, Jefferson, 1808-1889 | Presidents -- Confederate States of America -- Biography | Confederate States of America -- Politics and government | United States -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- Campaigns | Confederate States of America -- Biography | Statesmen -- United States -- BiographyAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Jefferson Davis, Confederate president.; Online version:: Jefferson Davis, Confederate president.DDC classification: 973.7/13/092 | B Other classification: 15.85
Contents:
What manner of man -- The establishment of government -- Provisional administration -- To Sumter -- Plates : persons -- The wait for land battles -- In the aftermath of first Manassas -- Forging the resources of war -- Northern power emerges -- Escalating degrees of warfare -- The threat of emancipation -- Union power affirmed -- The meaning of the war -- Plates : places -- War leadership in supreme test -- The great hope : that Lincoln be denied reelection -- The winter of great discontent -- The battlefield realities in 1865 -- The end in Virginia -- The pseudo-Confederacy -- Plates : art and community -- Epilogue : the postwar Davis.
Review: "He was one of the most embattled heads of state in American history. Charged with building a new nation while waging a war for its very independence, he accepted his responsibilities reluctantly but carried them out with a fierce dedication to his ideals. Those efforts ultimately foundered on the shoals of Confederate defeat, leaving Davis stranded in public memory as both valiant leader and desolate loser.".Summary: "Now two Civil War historians, Herman Hattaway and Richard Beringer, take a new and closer look at Davis's presidency. In the process, they provide a clearer image of his leadership and ability to handle domestic, diplomatic, and military matters under the most trying circumstances without the considerable industrial and population resources of the North and without the formal recognition of other nations."--BOOK JACKET.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Fiction notes: Click to open in new window
Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E467.1 .D26 H38 2002 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001734805

Includes bibliographical references (p. [509]-523) and index.

1. What manner of man -- 2. The establishment of government -- 3. Provisional administration -- 4. To Sumter -- Plates : persons -- 5. The wait for land battles -- 6. In the aftermath of first Manassas -- 7. Forging the resources of war -- 8. Northern power emerges -- 9. Escalating degrees of warfare -- 10. The threat of emancipation -- 11. Union power affirmed -- 12. The meaning of the war -- Plates : places -- 13. War leadership in supreme test -- 14. The great hope : that Lincoln be denied reelection -- 15. The winter of great discontent -- 16. The battlefield realities in 1865 -- 17. The end in Virginia -- 18. The pseudo-Confederacy -- Plates : art and community -- Epilogue : the postwar Davis.

"He was one of the most embattled heads of state in American history. Charged with building a new nation while waging a war for its very independence, he accepted his responsibilities reluctantly but carried them out with a fierce dedication to his ideals. Those efforts ultimately foundered on the shoals of Confederate defeat, leaving Davis stranded in public memory as both valiant leader and desolate loser.".

"Now two Civil War historians, Herman Hattaway and Richard Beringer, take a new and closer look at Davis's presidency. In the process, they provide a clearer image of his leadership and ability to handle domestic, diplomatic, and military matters under the most trying circumstances without the considerable industrial and population resources of the North and without the formal recognition of other nations."--BOOK JACKET.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

This book delivers more than its title suggests. It is, in fact, a comprehensive history of the Confederacy, in which Jefferson Davis naturally figures as the chief character. Sympathetic but not fawning, the authors' admiration for Davis sometimes makes their work seem sympathetic, not to the Confederate cause, but to the Confederacy's conduct. However, their discussion of slavery as the true cause of the Confederacy is outstanding. Hattaway (Univ. of Missouri-Kansas City) and Beringer (emer., Univ. of North Dakota) make good use of a vast body of both secondary and primary sources, including the most recent scholarship on Davis and the Confederacy. Topics covered include matters political, administrative, economic, military, and social. The authors conclude that Davis was in many ways an excellent chief executive but was hampered by various personality flaws. By the end of the war, he had become completely delusional regarding the chances for continued resistance, and finally came to the point, in effect, of asking men to go on fighting and dying to spare him the personal humiliation of failure--though he would never have admitted as much. This is an excellent book on both Davis and the Confederate experience for all levels and collections. S. E. Woodworth Texas Christian University

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.