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Inside deaf culture / Carol Padden, Tom Humphries.

By: Padden, Carol.
Contributor(s): Humphries, Tom (Tom L.).
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard University Press, 2005Description: 208 p. ; 22 cm.ISBN: 0674015061 (alk. paper); 9780674015067 (alk. paper).Subject(s): Deaf -- United States -- Social conditions | Deaf -- United States -- History | American Sign Language -- HistoryDDC classification: 305.9/082/0973 Other classification: 71.70
Contents:
Silenced bodies -- An entirely separate school -- The problem of voice -- A new class of consciousness -- Technology of voice -- Anxiety of culture -- The promise of culture -- Cultures into the future.
Review: "Carol Padden and Tom Humphries show how the nineteenth-century schools for the deaf, with their denigration of sign language and their insistence on oralist teaching, shaped the lives of Deaf people for generations to come. They describe how Deaf culture and art thrived in mid-twentieth century Deaf clubs and Deaf theater, and they profile controversial contemporary technologies." "Most triumphant is the story of the survival of the rich and complex American Sign Language, long misunderstood but finally recognized by a hearing world that could not conceive of language in a form other than speech."--BOOK JACKET.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
HV2545 .P35 2005 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001732734

Includes bibliographical references (p. 183-195) and index.

Silenced bodies -- An entirely separate school -- The problem of voice -- A new class of consciousness -- Technology of voice -- Anxiety of culture -- The promise of culture -- Cultures into the future.

"Carol Padden and Tom Humphries show how the nineteenth-century schools for the deaf, with their denigration of sign language and their insistence on oralist teaching, shaped the lives of Deaf people for generations to come. They describe how Deaf culture and art thrived in mid-twentieth century Deaf clubs and Deaf theater, and they profile controversial contemporary technologies." "Most triumphant is the story of the survival of the rich and complex American Sign Language, long misunderstood but finally recognized by a hearing world that could not conceive of language in a form other than speech."--BOOK JACKET.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Padden and Humphries' Deaf in America (1988) compellingly articulated Deaf culture. Their engagingly written sequel assesses "the promise of culture," focusing on complexities and contradictions. The wide-ranging thematic chapters focus on residential schools, sign language films, concepts of "voice" and technology, theater, organizations, and identity. Padden and Humphries (both, Univ. of California--San Diego) focus on power. Schools, they argue, subjugated Deaf bodies through sexual abuse, segregation, paternalism, and strict oralism. "Curing" deafness also represses Deafness. Including relevant scholarship such as John Schuchman's Hollywood Speaks (CH, Jan'89, 26-2641), Harry Lang's A Phone of Our Own (CH, Nov'00, 38-1534), Susan Burch's Signs of Resistance (CH, Jun'03, 40-6112), and Brenda Jo Brueggemann's Lend Me Your Ear (1999) would have enhanced the historical and cultural analysis. Many minorities receive cursory treatment, and the Deaf President Now movement is conspicuously absent. Closer editing could have corrected chronological inconsistencies, repetition, and various historical errors. The book's many assets include strong linguistic analyses, insights into Deaf theater and films, close attention to class, and diverse oral interviews. The authors' personal accounts are particularly poignant. Directly addressing sexual abuse, racism, and various technologies provides fresh, needed commentary. This sequel compellingly articulates Deaf people's resistance to domination. Overall, this is a valuable, provocative book. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. All levels/libraries. S. Burch Gallaudet University

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