Wandering peoples : colonialism, ethnic spaces, and ecological frontiers in northwestern Mexico, 1700-1850 / Cynthia Radding.

By: Radding Murrieta, CynthiaMaterial type: TextTextSeries: Latin America otherwise: Publisher: Durham : Duke University Press, 1997Description: xx, 404 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cmISBN: 0822319071 (cloth : alk. paper); 9780822319078 (cloth : alk. paper); 0822318997 (pbk. : alk. paper); 9780822318996 (pbk. : alk. paper)Subject(s): Ethnicity -- Mexico -- Sonora (State) | Social ecology -- Mexico -- Sonora (State) | Social change -- Mexico -- Sonora (State) | Social classes -- Mexico -- Sonora (State) | Indians of Mexico -- Mexico -- Sonora (State) -- History | Indians of Mexico -- Mexico -- Sonora (State) -- Social conditions | Sonora (Mexico : State) -- History | Sonora (Mexico : State) -- Social conditions | Sonora (Mexico : State) -- Ethnic relationsAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Wandering peoples.DDC classification: 305.8/0097217 LOC classification: GN560.M6 | R33 1997Other classification: 15.85
Contents:
Introduction: The Social Ecology of the Sonoran Frontier -- Los Sonoras and the Iberian Invasion of Northwestern Mexico. Ethnic Frontiers in the Sonoran Desert. Amerindian Economy in Sonora. Native Livelihood and the Colonial Economy -- The Intimate Sphere of Ethnicity: Household and Community. Sexuality, Marriage, and Family Formation in Sonora. "Gypseys" and Villagers: Shifting Communities and Changing Ethnic Identities in Highland Sonora -- Rival Proprietors and Changing Forms of Land Tenure. Land and the Indian Comun. Peasants, Hacendados, and Merchants: The Cultural Differentiation of Sonoran Society -- Ethnogenesis and Resistant Adaptation.
Review: "Balanced and thorough work on colonial and early-19th-century Sonora and Sinaloa combines historical and ethnohistorical methodologies, narratives, statistical data, and analysis of the changing relations among Indians, villagers, miners, missionaries, and the state. Describes and analyzes the changes in Indian communities. Discussion of the transition between colony and independent Mexico provides a vision of changes and continuities. Exceptionally wide collection of sources"--Handbook of Latin American Studies, v. 58. http://www.loc.gov/hlas/
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Book University of Texas At Tyler
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GN560 .M6 R33 1997 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001735950

Includes bibliographical references (p. [363]-390) and index.

"Balanced and thorough work on colonial and early-19th-century Sonora and Sinaloa combines historical and ethnohistorical methodologies, narratives, statistical data, and analysis of the changing relations among Indians, villagers, miners, missionaries, and the state. Describes and analyzes the changes in Indian communities. Discussion of the transition between colony and independent Mexico provides a vision of changes and continuities. Exceptionally wide collection of sources"--Handbook of Latin American Studies, v. 58.

http://www.loc.gov/hlas/

Introduction: The Social Ecology of the Sonoran Frontier -- Pt. 1. Los Sonoras and the Iberian Invasion of Northwestern Mexico. 1. Ethnic Frontiers in the Sonoran Desert. 2. Amerindian Economy in Sonora. 3. Native Livelihood and the Colonial Economy -- Pt. 2. The Intimate Sphere of Ethnicity: Household and Community. 4. Sexuality, Marriage, and Family Formation in Sonora. 5. "Gypseys" and Villagers: Shifting Communities and Changing Ethnic Identities in Highland Sonora -- Pt. 3. Rival Proprietors and Changing Forms of Land Tenure. 6. Land and the Indian Comun. 7. Peasants, Hacendados, and Merchants: The Cultural Differentiation of Sonoran Society -- Pt. 4. Ethnogenesis and Resistant Adaptation.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Radding's anthropological history delineates Indian cultural and institutional transformations in Sonora during the late colonial and early national periods in Mexico. It complements such studies as Eric Spicer's Cycles of Conquest (1963), Robert West's Sonora: Its Geographical Personality (1993), and several scholarly articles by Susan Deeds. Drawn largely from notarial records and Indian petitions in regional Mexican archives, Radding's work develops the themes of colonialism, subaltern identities and discourses, language perceptions, and social ecology. Much of her analysis treats the socioeconomic and cultural effects of the Jesuit and Franciscan missions on changing values among the indigenous peoples of northwest Mexico during the 18th and 19th centuries. Presenting a balanced assessment of the missionary impact, Raddings conclusions represent a major contribution to "new mission" historiography. Her convincing analysis of social consequences arising from ecological changes in Sonora enhances an understanding of Indian mobility in northern Mexico. Detailed tables and figures, helpful maps, extensive bibliography. Upper-division undergraduates and above. J. A. Gagliano Loyola University of Chicago

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Cynthia Radding is Assistant Professor of History at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

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