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Colony and empire : the capitalist transformation of the American West / William G. Robbins.

By: Robbins, William G, 1935-.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Development of western resources: Publisher: Lawrence, Kan. : University Press of Kansas, c1994Description: xvi, 255 p. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 0700606459 (alk. paper); 9780700606450 (alk. paper); 0700607501 (pbk.); 9780700607501 (pbk.).Subject(s): Capitalism -- West (U.S.) -- History | West (U.S.) -- Economic conditions | Mexican-American Border Region -- Economic conditions | Canada, Western -- Economic conditions | United States -- Economic conditions -- Regional disparities | Canada, Western Economic conditions | Capitalism West (U.S.) History | Mexican-American Border Region Economic conditions | United States Economic conditions Regional disparities | West (U.S.) Economic conditionsAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Colony and empire.DDC classification: 330.1220973 | 330.97809 Other classification: 15.85 | 15.09 | 7,26
Contents:
Pt. 1. Western myth, western reality. Ideology and the way west -- The U.S.-Mexico borderlands: tradition versus modernization -- The American and Canadian Wests: two nations, two cultures -- Pt. 2. Forces of transformation. In pursuit of private gain: the West as investment arena -- The industrial west: the paradox of the machine in the garden -- From capitalist patriarchy to corporate monopoly: the life and times of Samuel T. Hauser -- An "Equilibrium of chaos": external control and the northern West -- Pt. 3. Forces of integration. The South and the West: a comparative view -- Of country and city: the metropolis and hinterland in the modern West.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
HC107 .A17 R59 1994 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001735448

Includes bibliographical (p. 199-243) and index.

Pt. 1. Western myth, western reality. Ideology and the way west -- The U.S.-Mexico borderlands: tradition versus modernization -- The American and Canadian Wests: two nations, two cultures -- Pt. 2. Forces of transformation. In pursuit of private gain: the West as investment arena -- The industrial west: the paradox of the machine in the garden -- From capitalist patriarchy to corporate monopoly: the life and times of Samuel T. Hauser -- An "Equilibrium of chaos": external control and the northern West -- Pt. 3. Forces of integration. The South and the West: a comparative view -- Of country and city: the metropolis and hinterland in the modern West.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Robbins (American Forestry, Univ. of Nebraska Pr., 1985) focuses on changes in the American West during the last 150 years. These changes brought the West from a region of traders and hunters to an area driven by industrialism. Mechanization had a profound social and economic effect on all areas of Western life from agriculture to mining. Dividing his work into three parts, Robbins analyzes the myth and reality of the West, including the effects of proximity to Mexican and Canadian borders: he zeroes in on the capitalistic expansion of the West and develops comparisons between the South and West and the country and the city. The epilog discusses the emerging New West and its ties to the past, and there are extensive chapter notes with citations to other materials. This work will appeal to scholars and specialists in Western U.S. history.-Dorothy Lilly, Grosse Pointe North H.S. Lib., Grosse Pointe Woods, Mich. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

"The history of the northern West in the last decades of the nineteenth century is a story in the exercise of power and influence, of decisions made in faraway places, of chicanery and hucksterism, of limited local autonomy, and of grass roots suffering when the bets were called in banking centers in New York, Boston, London, Paris, and Berlin." So concludes Robbins (Oregon State Univ.) in this collection of "new Western history" essays. To those who would highlight the western frontier of agency and opportunity, Robbins counters with myriad examples of external control and perpetual dependency. The last hundred years or so of western history is primarily a story of externally imposed boom and bust as an expanding world economic system subsidized and then abandoned prairie wheat, mountain silver, Pacific coast lumber, and southern California defense production. The best portions of this book look at variations on this theme of capitalist transformation, as the author compares both the West's experiences and its myths with those of Mexico, Canada, and the American South. Drawing primarily upon a burgeoning secondary literature, this provocative book is richly footnoted. Upper-division undergraduate through faculty. D. Lindstrom; University of Wisconsin-Madison

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