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Lone star nation : how a ragged army of volunteers won the battle for Texas independence, and changed America / H.W. Brands.

By: Brands, H. W.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Doubleday, 2004Edition: 1st ed.Description: 582 p., [8] p. of plates : ill., maps ; 25 cm.ISBN: 0385507372 (alk. paper); 9780385507370 (alk. paper); 0385509286; 9780385509282.Subject(s): Texas -- History -- Revolution, 1835-1836 | Texas -- History -- To 1846 | Texas -- History -- 1846-1950Additional physical formats: Online version:: Lone star nation.; Online version:: Lone star nation.DDC classification: 976.4/03 Other classification: 15.85
Contents:
Part 1: The banks of the Brazos (to 1828) -- The promised land -- El Camino real -- The people of the horse -- Don Estevan -- The three hundred -- Part 2: Ravenous democracy (1828-1834) -- Love and war -- To defend the revolution -- What will become of Texas? -- A conspiracy of volunteers -- The general is friendly -- Part 3: Blood on the sand (1835-1836) -- The sword is drawn -- Lexington on the Guadalupe -- Behind Ben Milam -- The army of operations -- Victory or ... -- At discretion -- Runaway -- A people in arms -- Part 4: Lone Star and Union (1836-1865) -- Victors and vanquished -- Slavery and freedom -- Andrew Jackson dies happy -- The trial of Sam Houston.
Summary: Traces Texas's precarious historical journey to statehood, covering such events as its early colonization, the battle at the Alamo, its Native American and Mexican heritage, and its early days as a new republic.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
F390 .B833 2004 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001747401

Maps on endpapers.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [551]-563) and index.

Part 1: The banks of the Brazos (to 1828) -- The promised land -- El Camino real -- The people of the horse -- Don Estevan -- The three hundred -- Part 2: Ravenous democracy (1828-1834) -- Love and war -- To defend the revolution -- What will become of Texas? -- A conspiracy of volunteers -- The general is friendly -- Part 3: Blood on the sand (1835-1836) -- The sword is drawn -- Lexington on the Guadalupe -- Behind Ben Milam -- The army of operations -- Victory or ... -- At discretion -- Runaway -- A people in arms -- Part 4: Lone Star and Union (1836-1865) -- Victors and vanquished -- Slavery and freedom -- Andrew Jackson dies happy -- The trial of Sam Houston.

Traces Texas's precarious historical journey to statehood, covering such events as its early colonization, the battle at the Alamo, its Native American and Mexican heritage, and its early days as a new republic.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

All that turbulence before Texas became a state; from a Texas A&M professor. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

These two books join a growing body of recent work on Texas history that targets general readers as well as scholars. Both titles--the work of writers accomplished in a wide range of historical topics--cover essentially the same time period: Texas from its initial settlement to its independence from Mexico. Davis offers a detailed account of the intricate politics within Texas during the years that led up to the Texas Rebellion, effectively capturing the positions of the various factions as the conflict with Mexico unfolded. He is particularly adept at integrating the Tejano position. An extremely critical assessment of Sam Houston, the "Hero of San Jacinto," depicts him as an indecisive figure rendered ineffective by depression and alcoholism, who absented himself at critical periods and lacked a plan for resisting Mexican advances. Unfortunately, the work is undermined by a number of inconsistencies and errors (Texas was not annexed by treaty in 1845, and Monclova in not located "on the Rio Grande"). In his more traditional approach, Brands focuses on character development, especially Sam Houston, Stephan F. Austin, and Santa Anna, and spends much less time reconstructing Texan political debates. The resulting narrative is more accessible to nonspecialists, but diminishes the Tejano role in the revolution. Brands also devotes more attention to the relationship between Sam Houston and Andrew Jackson, and is less critical of Houston. He acknowledges Houston's absences and reputation as a hard drinker, but does not think they significantly impacted his military leadership. Instead, Brands' Sam Houston is plagued by lack of supplies and support from ineffectual governments, and the difficulty of imposing military discipline on an unruly, inexperienced volunteer army. While neither book radically challenges our understanding of the Texas Revolution, each uses extensive data to present interesting perspectives on the period and its people. ^BSumming Up: Recommended, both titles. All levels/libraries. C. D. Wintz Texas Southern University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

H.W. Brands was born Henry William Brands in Oregon. He graduated from Stanford University in 1975 with a B.A. in history, and from Jesuit High School in Portland, Oregon. He went on to earn his graduate degree in mathematics and history in Oregon and Texas. He taught at Vanderbilt University and Texas A&M University before he joined the faculty at the University of Texas at Austin. He acquired the title of Dickson Allen Anderson Centennial Professor of History at the U of Texas. He specializes in American History and politics, with books including Traitor to His Class, Andrew Jackson, The Age of Gold, the First American, and TR. Several of his books have been best sellers, including one recently published, The General vs. the President. Two of them - Traitor to His Class and The First American were finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. He lectures often on historical and current events and he can be seen and heard on national television and radio programs. <p> (Bowker Author Biography) H. W. Brands lives in Austin, Texas. <p> (Publisher Provided) H. W. Brands is Distinguished Professor of History and Ralph R. Thomas '21 Professor in Liberal Arts, Texas A&M University. <p> (Bowker Author Biography)

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