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River of doubt : Theodore Roosevelt's darkest journey / Candice Millard.

By: Millard, Candice.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Doubleday, 2005Edition: 1st ed.Description: ix, 416 p., [16] p. of plates : ill. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 0385507968; 9780385507967.Subject(s): Roosevelt River (Brazil) -- Description and travel | Amazon River Valley -- Description and travel | Rain forests -- Amazon River Valley | Natural history -- Amazon River Valley | Roosevelt-Rondon Scientific Expedition (1913-1914) | Roosevelt, Theodore, 1858-1919 -- Travel -- Brazil -- Roosevelt River | Presidents -- United States -- BiographyAdditional physical formats: Online version:: River of doubt.DDC classification: 918.1/13045
Contents:
Defeat -- Opportunity -- Preparation -- On the open sea -- A change of plans -- Beyond the frontier -- Disarray and tragedy -- Hard choices -- Warnings from the dead -- The unknown -- Pole and paddle, axe and machete -- The living jungle -- On the ink-black river -- Twitching through the woods -- The wild water -- Danger afloat, danger ashore -- Death in the rapids -- Attack -- The wide belts -- Hunger -- The myth of "beneficent nature" -- "I will stop here" -- Missing -- The worst in a man -- "He who kills must die" -- Judgment -- The cauldron -- The rubber men -- A pair of flags.
Summary: The true story of Theodore Roosevelt's harrowing 1914 exploration of one of the most dangerous rivers on earth, a black, uncharted tributary of the Amazon that snakes through one of the most treacherous jungles in the world. Indians armed with poison-tipped arrows haunt its shadows; piranhas glide through its waters; boulder-strewn rapids turn the river into a roiling cauldron. After his humiliating election defeat in 1912, Roosevelt set his sights on the most punishing physical challenge he could find, the first descent of an unmapped tributary of the Amazon. He and his men faced an unbelievable series of hardships, losing their canoes and supplies to punishing whitewater rapids, and enduring starvation, Indian attack, disease, drowning, and a murder within their own ranks. Three men died, and Roosevelt was brought to the brink of suicide. Yet he accomplished a feat so great that many at the time refused to believe it.--From publisher description.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
F2546 .M587 2005 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001747823

Includes bibliographical references (p. [395]-402) and index.

Defeat -- Opportunity -- Preparation -- On the open sea -- A change of plans -- Beyond the frontier -- Disarray and tragedy -- Hard choices -- Warnings from the dead -- The unknown -- Pole and paddle, axe and machete -- The living jungle -- On the ink-black river -- Twitching through the woods -- The wild water -- Danger afloat, danger ashore -- Death in the rapids -- Attack -- The wide belts -- Hunger -- The myth of "beneficent nature" -- "I will stop here" -- Missing -- The worst in a man -- "He who kills must die" -- Judgment -- The cauldron -- The rubber men -- A pair of flags.

The true story of Theodore Roosevelt's harrowing 1914 exploration of one of the most dangerous rivers on earth, a black, uncharted tributary of the Amazon that snakes through one of the most treacherous jungles in the world. Indians armed with poison-tipped arrows haunt its shadows; piranhas glide through its waters; boulder-strewn rapids turn the river into a roiling cauldron. After his humiliating election defeat in 1912, Roosevelt set his sights on the most punishing physical challenge he could find, the first descent of an unmapped tributary of the Amazon. He and his men faced an unbelievable series of hardships, losing their canoes and supplies to punishing whitewater rapids, and enduring starvation, Indian attack, disease, drowning, and a murder within their own ranks. Three men died, and Roosevelt was brought to the brink of suicide. Yet he accomplished a feat so great that many at the time refused to believe it.--From publisher description.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Whenever fate dealt him a blow, Theodore Roosevelt struck back by taking on a new physical challenge. Millard, formerly with National Geographic, charts how TR dealt with his "third term" loss for the White House in 1912: he accepted a lecture invation to Buenos Aires and followed it with a dangerous expedition deep into the Amazon in search of a remote tributary known as the River of Doubt. Millard's book has four central characters, each vividly brought to life: the 55-year-old ex-president; the celebrated Brazilian explorer Col. Candido Rondon; TR's 24-year-old second son, Kermit; and the Amazon rain forest itself, which nearly doomed the two dozen members of the expedition. From the outset, the three men had different goals. For TR it was his "last chance to be a boy" and to become a genuine explorer, for Rondo it was an opportunity to survey properly the river he had discovered in 1909, and for Kermit it was a duty to his mother, who worried about her aging husband. The expedition encompassed miles of impassable rapids, loss of canoes and supplies, malaria, near-starvation, cannibalistic Indians, deadly snakes and insects, and a murderous porter. Millard turns this incredible story into one that easily matches an Indiana Jones screen adventure. Essential.-William D. Pederson, Louisiana State Univ., Shreveport (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Candice Millard is a former writer and editor for National Geographic magazine. <p> Millard's first book, The River of Doubt: Theodore Roosevelt's Darkest Journey, was a New York Times bestseller and was named one of the best books of the year by a number of publications including the New York Times, Washington Post, San Francisco Chronicle, and Christian Science Monitor. The River of Doubt was also a Barnes & Noble Discover Great New Writers selection and a Book Sense Pick, was a finalist for the Quill Awards, and won the William Rockhill Nelson Award. <p> Millard's second book, The Destiny of the Republic: A Tale of Madness, Medicine & the Murder of a President, was released in September 2011. <p> Millard's book, Hero of the Empire: The Boer War, a Daring Escape, and the Making of Winston Churchill, made the New York Times Bestseller list in 2016. <p> (Bowker Author Biography)

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