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Forced founders : Indians, debtors, slaves, and the making of the American Revolution in Virginia / Woody Holton.

By: Holton, Woody.
Contributor(s): Omohundro Institute of Early American History & Culture.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Chapel Hill : Published for the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture, Williamsburg, Virginia, by the University of North Carolina Press, c1999Description: xxi, 231 p. : ill., 1 map ; 25 cm.ISBN: 0807825018 (alk. paper); 9780807825013 (alk. paper); 0807847844 (pbk. : alk. paper); 9780807847848 (pbk. : alk. paper).Subject(s): United States -- History -- Revolution, 1775-1783 -- Causes | United States -- History -- Revolution, 1775-1783 -- Social aspects | Virginia -- History -- Revolution, 1775-1783 | Virginia -- Social conditions -- 18th century | Gentry -- Virginia -- History -- 18th century | Social classes -- Virginia -- History -- 18th centuryAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Forced founders.DDC classification: 973.3/11 Other classification: 15.85
Contents:
Grievances, 1763-1774. Land speculators versus Indians and the privy council ; Tobacco growers versus merchants and Parliament -- Boycotts, 1769-1774. Nonimportation ; Nonexportation -- Unintended consequences, 1775-1776. Free Virginians versus slaves and Governor Dunmore ; Gentlemen versus farmers -- Independence, 1776. Spirit of the people.
Review: "In this provocative reinterpretation of one of the best-known events in American history, Woody Holton shows that when Thomas Jefferson, George Washington, and other elite Virginians joined their peers from other colonies in declaring independence from Britain, they acted partly in response to grassroots rebellions against their own rule."--BOOK JACKET.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E210 .H695 1999 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001511930

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Grievances, 1763-1774. Land speculators versus Indians and the privy council ; Tobacco growers versus merchants and Parliament -- Boycotts, 1769-1774. Nonimportation ; Nonexportation -- Unintended consequences, 1775-1776. Free Virginians versus slaves and Governor Dunmore ; Gentlemen versus farmers -- Independence, 1776. Spirit of the people.

"In this provocative reinterpretation of one of the best-known events in American history, Woody Holton shows that when Thomas Jefferson, George Washington, and other elite Virginians joined their peers from other colonies in declaring independence from Britain, they acted partly in response to grassroots rebellions against their own rule."--BOOK JACKET.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Holton's study is an important revisionist appraisal of the factors from 1763 to 1776 that propelled Virginians to support the Revolutionary movement and independence. Issues involving merchants, slaves, Indians, debtors, and aspirations of the gentry and small landholders are examined. The most original part of the book is the treatment of small landholders and their stake in the coming Revolution, especially in relation to the recession of the early 1770s. Holton tends to misrepresent and exaggerate some concerns, for example, resentment of the Navigation Acts, a persistent slave rebelliousness (before 1775), and the widespread existence of white social disorder (although the potential of the latter was not feared by the gentry). Evidence does not always support the author's conclusions. The weakest part of Holton's research and analysis is the period 1774 to 1776. He completely neglects the rise of a martial spirit and the proliferation and role of the Committees of Safety. Nor is much said about politics. Although Holton offers some wonderful insights, readers should approach much of what is said with caution. Extensive annotation reviews most of the significant work in the field. Recommended for all academic levels. H. M. Ward; University of Richmond

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Woody Holton is assistant professor of American History at Bloomsburg University in Pennsylvania.

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