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Anansi boys / Neil Gaiman.

By: Gaiman, Neil.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : William Morrow, c2005Edition: 1st ed.Description: 336 p. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 006051518X (acid-free paper); 9780060515188 (acid-free paper).Subject(s): Anansi (Legendary character) -- Fiction | Fathers and sons -- Fiction | Brothers -- Fiction | Gods -- Fiction | Adventure and adventurersDDC classification: 813/.54 LOC classification: PR6057.A319 | A85 2005
Contents:
Chapter I: Which is mostly about names and family relationships -- Chapter 2: Which is mostly about the things that happen after funerals -- Chapter 3: In which there is a family reunion -- Chapter 4: Which concludes with an evening of wine, women and song -- Chapter 5: In which we examine the many consequences of the morning after -- Chapter 6: In which Fat Charlie fails to get home, even by taxi -- Chapter 7: In which Fat Charlie goes a long way -- Chapter 8: In which a pot of coffee comes in particularly useful -- Chapter 9: In which Fat Charlie answers the door and spider encounters flamingos -- Chapter 10: In which Fat Charlie sees the world and Maeve Livingstone is dissatisfied -- Chapter 11: In which Rosie learns to say no to strangers and Fat Charlie acquires a lime -- Chapter 12: In which Fat Charlie does several things for the first time -- Chapter 13: Which proves to be unlucky for some -- Chapter 14: Which comes to several conclusions.
Summary: His past marked by his father's embarrassing taunts and untimely death, Fat Charlie meets the brother he never knew and is introduced to new and exciting ways to spend his time.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
CML Young Adult Fiction University of Texas At Tyler
CML Young Adult Fiction Area
G1416AN (Browse shelf) Available 0000001763473

Chapter I: Which is mostly about names and family relationships -- Chapter 2: Which is mostly about the things that happen after funerals -- Chapter 3: In which there is a family reunion -- Chapter 4: Which concludes with an evening of wine, women and song -- Chapter 5: In which we examine the many consequences of the morning after -- Chapter 6: In which Fat Charlie fails to get home, even by taxi -- Chapter 7: In which Fat Charlie goes a long way -- Chapter 8: In which a pot of coffee comes in particularly useful -- Chapter 9: In which Fat Charlie answers the door and spider encounters flamingos -- Chapter 10: In which Fat Charlie sees the world and Maeve Livingstone is dissatisfied -- Chapter 11: In which Rosie learns to say no to strangers and Fat Charlie acquires a lime -- Chapter 12: In which Fat Charlie does several things for the first time -- Chapter 13: Which proves to be unlucky for some -- Chapter 14: Which comes to several conclusions.

His past marked by his father's embarrassing taunts and untimely death, Fat Charlie meets the brother he never knew and is introduced to new and exciting ways to spend his time.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Strange things are happening to Fat Charlie; his dad dies, and then someone turns up claiming to be his long-lost brother. Is Fat Charlie in for some fun? Maybe tinged with terror? With a 12-city tour; a one-day laydown on September 20. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

School Library Journal Review

Adult/High School-Charles "Fat Charlie" Nancy leads a normal, boring existence in London. However, when he calls the U.S. to invite his estranged father to his wedding, he learns that the man just died. After jetting off to Florida for the funeral, Charlie not only discovers a brother he didn't know he had, but also learns that his father was the West African trickster god, Anansi. Charlie's brother, who possesses his own magical powers, later visits him at home and spins Charlie's life out of control, getting him fired, sleeping with his fianc?e, and even getting him arrested for a white-collar crime. Charlie fights back with assistance from other gods, and that's when the real trouble begins. They lead the brothers into adventures that are at times scary or downright hysterical. At first Charlie is overwhelmed by this new world, but he is Anansi's son and shows just as much flair for trickery as his brother. With its quirky, inventive fantasy, this is a real treat for Gaiman's fans. Here, he writes with a fuller sense of character. Focusing on a smaller cast gives him the room to breathe life into these figures. Anansi is also a story about fathers, sons, and brothers and how difficult it can be to get along even when they are so similar. Darkly funny and heartwarming to the end, this book is an addictive read not easily forgotten.-Matthew L. Moffett, Northern Virginia Community College, Annandale (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Neil Gaiman was born in Portchester, England on November 10, 1960. He worked as a journalist and freelance writer for a time, before deciding to try his hand at comic books. Some of his work has appeared in publications such as Time Out, The Sunday Times, Punch, and The Observer. His first comic endeavor was the graphic novel series The Sandman. The series has won every major industry award including nine Will Eisner Comic Industry Awards, three Harvey Awards, and the 1991 World Fantasy Award for best short story, making it the first comic ever to win a literary award. <p> He writes both children and adult books. His adult books include The Ocean at the End of the Lane, which won a British National Book Awards, and the Locus Award for Best Fantasy Novel for 2014; Stardust, which won the Mythopoeic Award as best novel for adults in 1999; American Gods, which won the Hugo, Nebula, Bram Stoker, SFX, and Locus awards; Anansi Boys; Trigger Warning: Short Fictions and Disturbances; and The View from the Cheap Seats: Selected Nonfiction, which is a New York Times Bestseller. His children's books include The Day I Swapped My Dad for Two Goldfish; Coraline, which won the Elizabeth Burr/Worzalla, the BSFA, the Hugo, the Nebula, and the Bram Stoker awards; The Wolves in the Walls; Odd and the Frost Giants; The Graveyard Book, which won the Newbery Award in 2009 and The Sandman: Overture which won the 2016 Hugo Awards Best Graphic Story. <p> (Bowker Author Biography)

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