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The minister's daughter / by Julie Hearn.

By: Hearn, Julie, 1958-.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Atheneum Books for Young Readers, 2005Edition: 1st U.S. ed.Description: 263 p. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 0689876904; 9780689876905.Subject(s): Witchcraft -- Juvenile fiction | Trials (Witchcraft) -- Juvenile fiction | Fairies -- Juvenile fiction | Paranormal fiction | Pregnancy -- Juvenile fiction | Sisters -- Juvenile fiction | Hopkins, Matthew, d. 1647 -- Juvenile fiction | Great Britain -- History -- Civil War, 1642-1649 -- Juvenile fiction | Somerset (England) -- History -- Civil War, 1642-1649 -- Juvenile fiction | Salem (Mass.) -- History -- Colonial period, ca. 1600-1775 -- Juvenile fictionAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Minister's daughter.DDC classification: [Fic] Summary: In 1645 in England, the daughters of the town minister successfully accuse a local healer and her granddaughter of witchcraft to conceal an out-of-wedlock pregnancy, but years later during the 1692 Salem trials their lie has unexpected repercussions.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
CML Young Adult Fiction University of Texas At Tyler
CML Young Adult Fiction Area
H4362MI (Browse shelf) Available 0000001763085

Published in Great Britain under the title "The Merrybegot."

In 1645 in England, the daughters of the town minister successfully accuse a local healer and her granddaughter of witchcraft to conceal an out-of-wedlock pregnancy, but years later during the 1692 Salem trials their lie has unexpected repercussions.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [264].

Reviews provided by Syndetics

School Library Journal Review

Gr 7 Up-In 1645, England is plunged into a Civil War pitting Puritans against Royalists, and is swept by a craze of witch-hunting, targeting women who practice healing arts drawn from ancient lore. Hearn intertwines the stories of three girls in one village. Two are daughters of the new minister, a man who fulminates against the old pagan ways, and Nell, who is the granddaughter of the local cunning woman. Because the elderly woman is failing in mind and body, Nell must quickly learn her skills and lore, including midwifery to humans and fairies. Meanwhile Grace, the minister's beautiful elder daughter, pregnant by a lad who runs away to be a soldier, draws her sister Patience into a conspiracy to blame her condition on witchcraft practiced by Nell and her grandmother. Caught up in Grace's hysteria, the villagers dunk the old woman in a pond and condemn Nell to hang. Chapters set in 1645 are written in third-person, present tense, and alternate with adult Patience's first-person, past tense, which readers later learn is her testimony during the Salem, MA, witch trials of 1692. These varied perspectives allow readers to penetrate lies and concealment. While piskies and fairies provide an element of fantasy that contributes to surprising plot twists, the novel is best described as entertaining historical fiction, paying tribute to wise, unconventional women whose skills come from an understanding of the natural world, not from supernatural powers. Engaging characters and a palpable sense of place combine with an accessible, clear style to make this a satisfying read.-Margaret A. Chang, Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts, North Adams (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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