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Smoky Mountain Rose : an Appalachian Cinderella / Alan Schroeder ; pictures by Brad Sneed.

By: Schroeder, Alan [author.].
Contributor(s): Sneed, Brad [illustrator.] | Perrault, Charles, 1628-1703. Cendrillon.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Picture Puffins: Description: 1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 28 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 0140566732; 9780140566734; 0613286472; 9780613286473.Uniform titles: Cinderella. Subject(s): Fairy tales | Folklore -- France | Cinderella (Tale) -- Appalachian Region -- Juvenile literatureDDC classification: 398.2 Other classification: I712.85 Summary: In this variation on the Cinderella story, based on the Charles Perrault version but set in the Smoky Mountains, Rose loses her glass slipper at a party given by the rich feller on the other side of the creek.
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Item type Current location Call number Copy number Status Date due Barcode
CML Dewey University of Texas At Tyler
CML Dewey Area
398.2 S3813sm (Browse shelf) Available 0000001763887
CML Dewey University of Texas At Tyler
CML Dewey Area
398.2 S3813sm (Browse shelf) 2 Available 0000002248094

Originally published: New York : Dial Books for Young Readers, 1997.

Based on Charles Perrault's Cendrillon.

In this variation on the Cinderella story, based on the Charles Perrault version but set in the Smoky Mountains, Rose loses her glass slipper at a party given by the rich feller on the other side of the creek.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

School Library Journal Review

K-Gr 4‘Schroeder has taken the classic Perrault fairy tale and recast it "smack in the heart o' the Smoky Mountains." He begins his retelling with the directive, "Now lis'en," and continues to relate the familiar events in lilting mountain dialect with plenty of homespun humor. Seb, the love interest here, is a "real rich feller‘made his fortune in sowbellies and grits." Rose's transformation takes place through intervention of a kindhearted, articulate hog. The tale concludes, "To this day, Rose and Seb are still livin' there, and folks reckon they're `bout the happiest twosome in all o' Tarbelly Creek," giving the story a contemporary bent. Everyone knows what's going to happen, but getting there is half the fun. Sneed's slick, stylized watercolors seem at first to be out of sync with the down-home narrative, but it quickly becomes clear that the disparate union is a successful one. The paintings are realistically rendered but slightly distorted‘figures are elongated and angular, features exaggerated, and perspectives askew. People are clad in fashions of the 1940s and the lush Appalachian landscape is always in evidence. The fanciful, but decidedly quirky artwork effectively informs readers, in case they didn't already know it, that there's magic in them thar hills. An appealing all-American addition to the canon of "Cinderella" variants.‘Luann Toth, School Library Journal (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Alan Schroeder, a lifelong admirer of Louis Armstrong, is the award-winning author of several picture books, including Lily and the Wooden Bowl, Minty, and Carolina Shout . His first book, Ragtime Tumpie , was chosen as an ALA Notable Book, a Booklist Children's Editors' Choice, and a Parents' Choice Award winner. He lives in Alameda, California.<br> <br> Brad Sneed is an artist, illustrator, and author of books for young readers. His books include Deputy Harvey and the Ant Cow Caper and Lucky Russell , and he has illustrated numerous books for other authors. He lives in Kansas with his wife and daughter.

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