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Changing national identities at the frontier : Texas and New Mexico, 1800-1850 / Andrés Reséndez.

By: Reséndez, Andrés.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Cambridge, U.K. ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2005Description: xiii, 309 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.ISBN: 0521835550; 9780521835558; 0521543193 (pbk.); 9780521543194 (pbk.).Subject(s): Texas -- History -- To 1846 | New Mexico -- History -- To 1848 | Mexican War, 1846-1848 -- Social aspects | Frontier and pioneer life -- Texas | Frontier and pioneer life -- New Mexico | Texas -- Ethnic relations | New Mexico -- Ethnic relations | Nationalism -- Texas -- History -- 19th century | Nationalism -- New Mexico -- History -- 19th centuryDDC classification: 976.4/05 Other classification: 15.85
Contents:
Carved spaces: Mexico's Far North, the American Southwest, or Indian domains? -- A nation made visible: patronage, power, and ritual -- The spirit of mercantile enterprise -- The benediction of the Roman ritual -- The Texas Revolution and the not-so-secret history of shifting loyalties -- The fate of Governor Albino Pérez -- State, market, and literary cultures -- New Mexico at the razor's edge.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
F390 .R46 2005 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001766062
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
F390 .R46 2005 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001766070

Includes bibliographical references (p. 273-293) and index.

Carved spaces: Mexico's Far North, the American Southwest, or Indian domains? -- A nation made visible: patronage, power, and ritual -- The spirit of mercantile enterprise -- The benediction of the Roman ritual -- The Texas Revolution and the not-so-secret history of shifting loyalties -- The fate of Governor Albino Pérez -- State, market, and literary cultures -- New Mexico at the razor's edge.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

This excellent study answers the question of why populations in New Mexico and Texas apparently shifted their loyalties so easily during the Texas Revolution and Mexican War. Resendez (Univ. of California, Davis) argues that on Mexico's northern frontier, national identities vacillated between two powerful forces: those of the state and those of the market. Identities shifted as Americans, Mexicans, and Native Americans traded, intermarried, and otherwise interacted with each other. Ultimately, market forces proved more powerful than the Mexican government's attempt to forge a single national identity. Although the book's basic premise echoes that of older interpretations, the author's use of recent theories borrowed from history and other social sciences provides them with new elan. The discussion of Native American and African American identity sometimes disappears into the background, but Resendez's command of general political, economic, and cultural issues is remarkable. The level of detail for such a relatively small volume is impressive, even though it may deter some undergraduate students. Readers less familiar with borderlands history will appreciate the excellent introduction. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. M. J. Van de Logt Indiana University Bloomington

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Andres Resendez is an assistant professor in the Department of History at the University of California, Davis.

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