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Carry me back : the domestic slave trade in American life / Steven Deyle.

By: Deyle, Steven.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Oxford University Press, 2005Description: x, 398 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.ISBN: 0195160401 (alk. paper); 9780195160406 (alk. paper).Subject(s): Slavery -- United States -- History -- 19th century | Slaves -- United States -- Social conditions -- 19th century | Slave trade -- United States -- History -- 19th century | United States -- Race relations | United States -- Economic conditions -- 19th century | Slave trade -- Southern States -- History -- 19th century | Southern States -- Race relations | Southern States -- Economic conditions -- 19th centuryDDC classification: 381/.44/0973 Other classification: 15.85
Contents:
The irony of liberty: origins of the domestic slave trade -- A most important form of commerce: the rise of the cotton kingdom -- A most fateful form of commerce: the fall of the cotton kingdom -- "CASH FOR NEGROES": slave traders and the market revolution in the south -- A regular part of everyday life: the buying and selling of human property -- Outside looking in: the domestic slave trade and the abolitionist attack on slavery -- Inside looking out: the slave trade's effect upon the white south -- "The nastiness of life": African-American resistance to the domestic slave trade.
Review: "Drawing together the voices of professional slave traders and abolitionists, buyers and overseers, politicians and enslaved peoples, Carry Me Back restores the domestic slave trade to the prominent place that it deserves in early American history. In so doing, this far-reaching study exposes the many complexities of southern slavery and antebellum American life."--Jacket.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E449 .D525 2005 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001777424

Includes bibliographical references (p. [349]-380) and index.

The irony of liberty: origins of the domestic slave trade -- A most important form of commerce: the rise of the cotton kingdom -- A most fateful form of commerce: the fall of the cotton kingdom -- "CASH FOR NEGROES": slave traders and the market revolution in the south -- A regular part of everyday life: the buying and selling of human property -- Outside looking in: the domestic slave trade and the abolitionist attack on slavery -- Inside looking out: the slave trade's effect upon the white south -- "The nastiness of life": African-American resistance to the domestic slave trade.

"Drawing together the voices of professional slave traders and abolitionists, buyers and overseers, politicians and enslaved peoples, Carry Me Back restores the domestic slave trade to the prominent place that it deserves in early American history. In so doing, this far-reaching study exposes the many complexities of southern slavery and antebellum American life."--Jacket.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Much has been written on the antebellum period, but the troubling topic of the domestic (as compared with the international) slave trade, and particularly its relationship to the coming of the Civil War, has not been thoroughly explored. In his first book, Deyle (history, Univ. of California, Davis) takes up the topic. His thoughtful analysis links the domestic slave trade with the drawing together of the upper and lower regions of the South, thus placing the trade within the wider market revolution. He also examines the differing manner in which the buying and selling of human beings was viewed by those in the South and in the North and by the African Americans who suffered most through it. Linking the domestic slave trade with the eventual demise of slavery, he also examines how historic memory has treated the topic. Based on a vast array of primary sources, this valuable study is essential for academic collections of all sizes, even those who already own recent works that examine other aspects of the trade, such as Robert H. Gudmestad's A Troublesome Commerce: The Transformation of the Interstate Slave Trade.-Theresa McDevitt, Indiana Univ. of Pennsylvania Lib. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

Between 1820 and 1860, some two million slaves were sold in the US South, half in intrastate transfers. These sales represented three times the capital invested in all US manufacturing and equaled the value of all land transactions in the South during the same era. Thus, the internal market economy of slave sales was a huge and essential part of the southern economy. Every slave owner was at some time a capitalist engaged in the slave trade. The realities of marketing human beings were the chief ideological weapons used by the abolitionists, and the chief moral weakness of the slave master. The immorality of slavery had to be repressed in an image of paternalism and with the inventive scapegoat of the slave-trader as a minor outcast of southern culture, not as a person essential to its existence. With 50 pages of notes and a 30-page bibliography, which includes 80 southern newspapers of the period, this volume represents exhaustive research in 36 major archival collections. Although solidly based on data, the work is easily accessible to general readers. This is clearly one of the most important books on US slavery to appear in over 100 years, and is certain to be one of the most controversial based on its theses. ^BSumming Up: Essential. All levels/libraries. R. T. Brown formerly, Westfield State College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Steven Deyle is Associate Professor of History at the University of Houston.

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