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General George Washington : a military life / Edward G. Lengel.

By: Lengel, Edward G.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Random House, c2005Edition: 1st ed.Description: xlii, 450 p., [16] p. of plates : ill., maps ; 25 cm.ISBN: 1400060818 (alk. paper); 9781400060818 (alk. paper).Subject(s): Washington, George, 1732-1799 | Washington, George, 1732-1799 -- Military leadership | Generals -- United States -- Biography | United States. Continental Army -- Biography | Presidents -- United States -- Biography | United States -- History -- Revolution, 1775-1783 -- Campaigns | United States -- History -- French and Indian War, 1754-1763 -- CampaignsAdditional physical formats: Online version:: General George Washington.; Online version:: General George Washington.DDC classification: 973.4/1092 | B
Contents:
Prologue -- Acknowledgments -- List of maps -- Biographies -- Chronology -- 1: Young frontiersman: May 1741-February 1753 -- 2: Ohio: October 1753-January 1754 -- 3: Fort Necessity: January-October 1754 -- 4: Braddock: January-July 1755 -- 5: Virginia regiment: July 1755-January 1759 -- 6: Call to arms: 1759-1775 -- 7: Boston: June 1755-March 1776 -- 8: New York: March-August 1776 -- 9: Retreat: September-December 1776 -- 10: Redemption: Trenton; December, 1776 -- 11: Princeton: December 1776-January 1777 -- 12: Philadelphia: December 1776-September 1777 -- 13: Germantown: September-October 1777 -- 14: Valley Forge: December 1777-May 1778 -- 15: Monmouth: May-June 1778 -- 16: Dark before the dawn: 1778-1781 -- 17: Victory: September 1780-December 1783 -- 18: Old soldier: 1784-1799 -- 19: First in war? -- Notes -- Bibliography -- Index.
Summary: In a revealing work of historical biography, Edward Lengel has written the definitive account of George Washington the soldier. Based largely on Washington's personal papers, this engrossing book paints a vivid, factual portrait of a man to whom lore and legend so tenaciously cling. To Lengel, Washington was the imperfect commander. Washington possessed no great tactical ingenuity, and his acknowledged brilliance in retreat only demonstrates the role luck plays in the fortunes of all great men. He was not a professional, but a citizen soldier, who, at a time when warfare demanded that armies maneuver efficiently in precise formation, had little practical training handling men in combat. Yet despite his flaws, Washington was a remarkable figure, a true man of the moment. America could never have won freedom without him. At once informative and engaging General George Washington is a book that reintroduces readers to a figure many think they already know.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book Longview campus
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E312.25 .L46 2005 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001775774
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E312.25 .L46 2005 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001775766

Includes bibliographical references (p. [373]-434) and index.

Prologue -- Acknowledgments -- List of maps -- Biographies -- Chronology -- 1: Young frontiersman: May 1741-February 1753 -- 2: Ohio: October 1753-January 1754 -- 3: Fort Necessity: January-October 1754 -- 4: Braddock: January-July 1755 -- 5: Virginia regiment: July 1755-January 1759 -- 6: Call to arms: 1759-1775 -- 7: Boston: June 1755-March 1776 -- 8: New York: March-August 1776 -- 9: Retreat: September-December 1776 -- 10: Redemption: Trenton; December, 1776 -- 11: Princeton: December 1776-January 1777 -- 12: Philadelphia: December 1776-September 1777 -- 13: Germantown: September-October 1777 -- 14: Valley Forge: December 1777-May 1778 -- 15: Monmouth: May-June 1778 -- 16: Dark before the dawn: 1778-1781 -- 17: Victory: September 1780-December 1783 -- 18: Old soldier: 1784-1799 -- 19: First in war? -- Notes -- Bibliography -- Index.

In a revealing work of historical biography, Edward Lengel has written the definitive account of George Washington the soldier. Based largely on Washington's personal papers, this engrossing book paints a vivid, factual portrait of a man to whom lore and legend so tenaciously cling. To Lengel, Washington was the imperfect commander. Washington possessed no great tactical ingenuity, and his acknowledged brilliance in retreat only demonstrates the role luck plays in the fortunes of all great men. He was not a professional, but a citizen soldier, who, at a time when warfare demanded that armies maneuver efficiently in precise formation, had little practical training handling men in combat. Yet despite his flaws, Washington was a remarkable figure, a true man of the moment. America could never have won freedom without him. At once informative and engaging General George Washington is a book that reintroduces readers to a figure many think they already know.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Lengel (history, Univ. of Virginia; assoc. ed., The Papers of George Washington) attempts to give readers a balanced view of Washington as a military leader, beginning with his appointment in 1753 as a major in the Virginia militia and extending to his death in 1799, when he was once again serving as commander of America's forces. Lengel shows that Washington was not a great general. Many of his shortcomings, including impulsiveness, overconfidence, misjudgment of his enemy, and his being a poor tactician, were demonstrated in his first major engagement at Fort Necessity (Pennsylvania) in 1754 and were to be repeated throughout his military career. Lengel makes the case that despite these shortcomings Washington possessed the perfect combination of personal, social, political, and leadership skills to win the war with England. It was this unique combination, not his abilities as a general, that made him a truly great man and the only leader of that period who could have accomplished what he did. Lengel's role at his university's George Washington Papers Project gave him unprecedented access to many unstudied and unpublished materials: Washington's papers serve as the foundation for the book. Well researched and written, with detailed battle descriptions, this book is recommended for Washington scholars and libraries with a special interest in the military context of his career. Other libraries may be better served by a recent biography such as Joseph Ellis's His Excellency: George Washington.-Robert Flatley, Kutztown Univ., PA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

This brilliant study of the illustrious Virginian's military life from boyhood to old age focuses primarily on Washington during the American Revolution. Lengel (Univ. of Virginia) describes a man who was indecisive, daring, too trusting of subordinates, overmatched by his Anglo-German adversaries, plagued by enlistment issues, beset by supply shortages, second-guessed by civil authorities and some of his generals, and bewitched by the dream of a quick and crushing defeat of the enemy. Yet Washington was also a man who respected civilian authority, never lost faith in the quest for American independence, possessed a continental vision for the new US, was a stern leader intolerant of looting and mistreatment of enemy prisoners, was personally brave, and, above all, was the commander of the most important American army for eight and one half years. He was truly the "indispensable" man, the glue that held the revolution together. Lengel's book is authoritative, grounded in primary sources, sprinkled with well-chosen quotes, and a joy to read. It also has excellent maps, very good illustrations, 15 pages of mini-biographies, and a chronology of events. Finally, this reviewer believes that if Mount Rushmore's sculptor, Gutzon Borglum, had read this book, he would have given the great man his own mountain. ^BSumming Up: Essential. All levels/libraries. C. L. Egan formerly, University of Houston

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