Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Imagination and play in the electronic age / Dorothy G. Singer and Jerome L. Singer.

By: Singer, Dorothy G.
Contributor(s): Singer, Jerome L.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard University Press, 2005Description: 210 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.ISBN: 0674017455 (alk. paper); 9780674017450 (alk. paper).Subject(s): Play | Imagination in children | Television and children | Computers and childrenAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Imagination and play in the electronic age.DDC classification: 306.4/81 Other classification: 77.36
Contents:
Our conscious imagination -- Play: its beginnings and stages -- Television and imagination -- Violent themes in play, TV content, and video games -- Adrift in cyberspace: children and computer play -- A role for play in early learning.
Summary: Two wise and long-admired observers of children's make-believe look at the cognitive and moral potential, and concern, created by electronic media.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
BF717 .S5145 2005 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001779230

Includes bibliographical references (p. 171-201) and index.

Our conscious imagination -- Play: its beginnings and stages -- Television and imagination -- Violent themes in play, TV content, and video games -- Adrift in cyberspace: children and computer play -- A role for play in early learning.

Two wise and long-admired observers of children's make-believe look at the cognitive and moral potential, and concern, created by electronic media.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Concise and readable, this book offers a compelling examination of the ways in which video games, television, and the Internet (both e-mail and the Web) help to shape the lives of contemporary children, adolescents, and adults. Singer and Singer (codirectors of the Yale Family Television Research and Consultation Center) focus on the younger set, and they begin with a discussion of the mind's capacity for growth and self-knowledge. They move through an authoritative discussion of the impact of television on individual consciousness to arrive at a reasoned but impassioned indictment (no other word seems possible) of violent "point and kill" video games, which reduce all social transactions to the level of primal violence. In the chapter titled "Adrift in Cyberspace," the authors discuss the implications of children set free in that vast territory. The volume concludes with an argument for the "role of play in early learning," in which corporate sponsors do not commodify children's imaginations. Lucid, reasoned, elegantly written, and meticulously documented, this is a volume of considerable importance and value. ^BSumming Up: Essential. All collections; all levels. W. W. Dixon University of Nebraska--Lincoln

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.