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Lovers and beloveds : sexual otherness in southern fiction, 1936-1961 / Gary Richards.

By: Richards, Gary, 1969-.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Southern literary studies: Publisher: Baton Rouge : Louisiana State University Press, c2005Description: x, 243 p. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 0807130516 (alk. paper); 9780807130513 (alk. paper).Subject(s): American fiction -- Southern States -- History and criticism | Homosexuality and literature -- Southern States -- History -- 20th century | American fiction -- 20th century -- History and criticism | Erotic stories, American -- History and criticism | Love stories, American -- History and criticism | Difference (Psychology) in literature | Sexual orientation in literature | Homosexuality in literature | Lesbians in literature | Gay men in literatureDDC classification: 813/.509353
Contents:
Freaks with a voice -- Truman Capote, William Goyen, and the gendering of male homosexuality -- Richard Wright and compulsory Black male heterosexuality -- Lillian Smith and the scripting of lesbian desire -- Harper Lee and the destabilization of heterosexuality -- Carson McCullers and gay/lesbian (non) representation -- Epilogue : other voices, other rooms.
Review: "A challenge to traditional criticism, this study demonstrates that issues of sexuality - and same-sex desire in particular - were of central importance in the literary output of the Southern Renaissance. Especially during the end of that period - approximately the 1940s and 1950s - the national literary establishment tacitly designated the South as an allowable setting for fictionalized deviancy, thus permitting southern writers tremendous freedom to explore sexual otherness. In Lovers and Beloveds, Gary Richards draws on contemporary theories of sexuality in reading the fiction of six writers of the era who accepted that potentially pejorative characterization as an opportunity: Truman Capote, William Goyen, Harper Lee, Carson McCullers, Lillian Smith, and Richard Wright."--BOOK JACKET.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
PS374 .H63 R53 2005 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001775899

Includes bibliographical references (p. 221-231) and index.

Freaks with a voice -- Truman Capote, William Goyen, and the gendering of male homosexuality -- Richard Wright and compulsory Black male heterosexuality -- Lillian Smith and the scripting of lesbian desire -- Harper Lee and the destabilization of heterosexuality -- Carson McCullers and gay/lesbian (non) representation -- Epilogue : other voices, other rooms.

"A challenge to traditional criticism, this study demonstrates that issues of sexuality - and same-sex desire in particular - were of central importance in the literary output of the Southern Renaissance. Especially during the end of that period - approximately the 1940s and 1950s - the national literary establishment tacitly designated the South as an allowable setting for fictionalized deviancy, thus permitting southern writers tremendous freedom to explore sexual otherness. In Lovers and Beloveds, Gary Richards draws on contemporary theories of sexuality in reading the fiction of six writers of the era who accepted that potentially pejorative characterization as an opportunity: Truman Capote, William Goyen, Harper Lee, Carson McCullers, Lillian Smith, and Richard Wright."--BOOK JACKET.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Richards (Univ. of New Orleans) has written a remarkably nuanced discussion of sexual otherness in Southern fiction. Avoiding the practice of "outing" writers on flimsy evidence, the author roots his discussion in close readings of texts but uses biographical materials when they are relevant. Readers will learn a great deal about Richard Wright from Richards's brilliant readings of some of Wright's less-known works. In eschewing muddled discussion of gender themes, the author makes sense of Carson McCullers. And he explores William Goyen's rather obscure treatments of male sexuality and refrains from drawing conclusions that only biographical evidence (not yet available) could clarify. Richards's scattered references to Faulkner are useful and might have been collected into a full chapter on the novelist, particularly given the fact that Faulkner's treatment of homosexual panic is an interesting strain in a fictional universe. The full notes will lead the reader to other interesting materials. The bibliography is extensive, and the comprehensive index includes themes as well as names and titles. A solid resource for those interested in gay studies, gender studies, and American fiction. ^BSumming Up: Essential. Lower-division undergraduates through faculty. B. Almon University of Alberta

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