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Teaching reading to black adolescent males : closing the achievement gap / Alfred W. Tatum.

By: Tatum, Alfred W.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Portland, Me. : Stenhouse Publishers, c2005Description: x, 165 p. ; 24cm.ISBN: 1571103937; 9781571103932.Subject(s): African American boys -- Education (Secondary) | African American teenagers -- Education (Secondary) | Reading (Secondary) -- United States | Reading -- Remedial teaching -- United States | African American boys -- Social conditions | African American teenagers -- Social conditionsAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Teaching reading to black adolescent males.; Online version:: Teaching reading to black adolescent males.DDC classification: 428.4071/2 Other classification: 5,3 | DP 1250
Contents:
Literacy development in black adolescent males -- Turmoil and the promise of reading -- Black males and the reading achievement gap -- Reconceptualizing the role of literacy instruction -- Structuring curriculum orientations that empower students -- A culturally responsive approach to literacy teaching -- Using a comprehensive framework -- Discussing texts -- Strengthening the assessment profile -- Establishing a professional-development community -- Conducting teacher inquiries.
Review: "For those who truly wish to leave no child behind, the racial achievement gap in literacy is one of the most difficult issues in education today, and nowhere does it manifest itself more perniciously than in the case of black adolescent males." "Approaching the problem from the inside, Alfred Tatum brings together his various experiences as a black male student, middle school teacher working with struggling black male readers, reading specialist in an urban elementary school, and staff developer in classrooms across the nation. His new book, Teaching Reading to Black Adolescent Males, offers teachers and schools a way to reconceptualize literacy instruction for those who need it most." "Alfred bridges the connections among theory, instruction, and professional development to create a roadmap for better literacy achievement. He presents practical suggestions for providing reading strategy instruction and assessment that is explicit, meaningful, and culturally responsive, as well as guidelines for selecting and discussing nonfiction and fiction texts with black males." "The author's first-hand insights provide middle school and high school teachers, reading specialists, and administrators with new perspectives to help schools move collectively toward the essential goal of literacy achievement for all."--BOOK JACKET.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
LC2779 .T38 2005 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001779354

Includes bibliographical references (p. 159-165).

Literacy development in black adolescent males -- Turmoil and the promise of reading -- Black males and the reading achievement gap -- Reconceptualizing the role of literacy instruction -- Structuring curriculum orientations that empower students -- A culturally responsive approach to literacy teaching -- Using a comprehensive framework -- Discussing texts -- Strengthening the assessment profile -- Establishing a professional-development community -- Conducting teacher inquiries.

"For those who truly wish to leave no child behind, the racial achievement gap in literacy is one of the most difficult issues in education today, and nowhere does it manifest itself more perniciously than in the case of black adolescent males." "Approaching the problem from the inside, Alfred Tatum brings together his various experiences as a black male student, middle school teacher working with struggling black male readers, reading specialist in an urban elementary school, and staff developer in classrooms across the nation. His new book, Teaching Reading to Black Adolescent Males, offers teachers and schools a way to reconceptualize literacy instruction for those who need it most." "Alfred bridges the connections among theory, instruction, and professional development to create a roadmap for better literacy achievement. He presents practical suggestions for providing reading strategy instruction and assessment that is explicit, meaningful, and culturally responsive, as well as guidelines for selecting and discussing nonfiction and fiction texts with black males." "The author's first-hand insights provide middle school and high school teachers, reading specialists, and administrators with new perspectives to help schools move collectively toward the essential goal of literacy achievement for all."--BOOK JACKET.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

A former middle and high school teacher and now a professor of literacy education at Northern Illinois University (and black himself), Tatum tackles directly the question of how one can successfully teach black adolescent boys to read. Tatum is well acquainted with the latest research and literature on the subject, and he draws reflectively and movingly from his own years of teaching Afro-American youngsters. His book is well organized, at times overly so. He takes off from a vivid description of the turmoil that most poor black kids are living through at home and that makes their problems with reading particularly difficult, but not, according to Tatum, insuperable. Aimed directly at teachers, the book warns against instruction geared precisely--as Tatum believes most of No Child Left Behind instruction is geared--to improving scores on standardized tests to close the gap between black and white scores. Tatum sees literacy as one tool to help the black child overcome his understandable sense of powerlessness, which is also the major underlying cause of his difficulties with reading. Particularly cogent are the chapter epigraphs, personal anecdotes, and excellent bibliography. Especially valuable for anyone teaching or preparing to teach reading to adolescents, and not just black adolescents. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. All levels. R. O. Ulin emeritus, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

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