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The Black Arts Movement : literary nationalism in the 1960s and 1970s / James Edward Smethurst.

By: Smethurst, James Edward.
Material type: TextTextSeries: John Hope Franklin series in African American history and culture: Publisher: Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, 2005Description: xv, 471 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.ISBN: 080782934X (alk. paper); 9780807829349 (alk. paper); 0807855987 (pbk. : alk. paper); 9780807855980 (pbk. : alk. paper).Subject(s): American literature -- African American authors -- History and criticism | Black nationalism -- United States -- History -- 20th century | African Americans -- Intellectual life -- 20th century | African Americans in literature | Black nationalism in literature | Black Arts movement | Geschichte 1960-1980 | USAAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Black Arts Movement.DDC classification: 810.9/896073 Other classification: HU 1728
Contents:
Foreground and underground : the Left, nationalism, and the origins of the Black arts matrix -- Artists imagine the nation, the nation imagines art : the Black Arts Movement and popular culture, history, gender, performance, and textuality -- New York altar city : New York, the Northeast, and the development of Black arts cadres and ideologies -- Institutions for the people : Chicago, Detroit, and the Black Arts Movement in the Midwest -- Bandung world : the West Coast, the Black Arts Movement, and the development of revolutionary nationalism, cultural nationalism, third worldism, and multiculturalism -- Behold the land : regionalism, the Black nation, and the Black Arts Movement in the South.
Summary: Emerging from a matrix of Old Left, black nationalist, and bohemian ideologies and institutions, African American artists and intellectuals in the 1960s coalesced to form the Black Arts Movement, the cultural wing of the Black Power Movement. In this comprehensive analysis, James Smethurst examines the formation of the Black Arts Movement and demonstrates how it deeply influenced the production and reception of literature and art in the United States through its negotiations of the ideological climate of the Cold War, decolonization, and the civil rights movement. Taking a regional approach, Smethurst examines local expressions of the nascent Black Arts Movement, a movement distinctive in its geographical reach and diversity, while always keeping the frame of the larger movement in view. The Black Arts Movement, he argues, fundamentally changed American attitudes about the relationship between popular culture and "high" art and dramatically transformed the landscape of public funding for the arts.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
PS153 .N5 S56 2005 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001775949

Includes bibliographical references (p. [429]-458) and index.

Foreground and underground : the Left, nationalism, and the origins of the Black arts matrix -- Artists imagine the nation, the nation imagines art : the Black Arts Movement and popular culture, history, gender, performance, and textuality -- New York altar city : New York, the Northeast, and the development of Black arts cadres and ideologies -- Institutions for the people : Chicago, Detroit, and the Black Arts Movement in the Midwest -- Bandung world : the West Coast, the Black Arts Movement, and the development of revolutionary nationalism, cultural nationalism, third worldism, and multiculturalism -- Behold the land : regionalism, the Black nation, and the Black Arts Movement in the South.

Emerging from a matrix of Old Left, black nationalist, and bohemian ideologies and institutions, African American artists and intellectuals in the 1960s coalesced to form the Black Arts Movement, the cultural wing of the Black Power Movement. In this comprehensive analysis, James Smethurst examines the formation of the Black Arts Movement and demonstrates how it deeply influenced the production and reception of literature and art in the United States through its negotiations of the ideological climate of the Cold War, decolonization, and the civil rights movement. Taking a regional approach, Smethurst examines local expressions of the nascent Black Arts Movement, a movement distinctive in its geographical reach and diversity, while always keeping the frame of the larger movement in view. The Black Arts Movement, he argues, fundamentally changed American attitudes about the relationship between popular culture and "high" art and dramatically transformed the landscape of public funding for the arts.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

After a period of relative neglect, the Black Arts Movement, which includes such important writers as Amiri Baraka, Sonia Sanchez, Nikki Giovanni, and Haki Madhubuti, has lately received increasing critical attention. Important works on the movement include specialized writings--e.g., Ready for Revolution (2003), the autobiography of Kwame Ture (Stokely Carmichael), and Scot Brown's Fighting for US (CH, Mar'04, 41-4218)--and such general studies as Rod Bush's We Are Not What We Seem (CH, Jun'99, 36-5997). Also author of The New Red Negro (CH, Dec'99, 37-2042), Smethurst (Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst) begins the present provocative book by carefully laying out the interconnections between politics and culture in the Black Power and Black Arts movements. He establishes the roots of the Black Arts Movement in the Cold War and the Civil Rights Movement and relates it to other literary movements, e.g., Beat and Black Mountain poetry. Smethurst also discusses how regionalism impacted the movement in New York City, Chicago, the South, and elsewhere. The book's greatest strength is its clear political and cultural contextualization. This sophisticated study is not for the casual reader, but it will be seminal for those who want an in-depth analysis of this important movement. ^BSumming Up: Essential. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty. L. J. Parascandola Long Island University

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