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JFK, LBJ, and the Democratic Party / Sean J. Savage.

By: Savage, Sean J, 1964-.
Material type: TextTextSeries: SUNY series on the presidency: Publisher: Albany : State University of New York Press, c2004Description: ix, 429 p., [24] leaves of plates : ill. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 0791461696 (alk. paper); 9780791461693 (alk. paper); 9780791461709 (pbk.); 079146170X (pbk.).Subject(s): Kennedy, John F. (John Fitzgerald), 1917-1963 | Johnson, Lyndon B. (Lyndon Baines), 1908-1973 | Democratic Party (U.S.) -- History -- 20th century | United States -- Politics and government -- 1961-1963 | United States -- Politics and government -- 1963-1969 | Political culture -- United States -- History -- 20th century | Massachusetts -- Politics and government -- 1951- | Texas -- Politics and government -- 1951- | Political culture -- Massachusetts -- History -- 20th century | Political culture -- Texas -- History -- 20th centuryDDC classification: 324.2736/09/046 Other classification: 15.85
Contents:
JFK and his party -- LBJ and his party -- The 1960 election : rivals and allies -- The party politics of public policy -- JFK, LBJ, and the DNC -- The politics of consensus : 1962-1964 -- The politics of dissensus : 1966-1968.
Review: "JFK, LBJ, and the Democratic Party is a detailed, comprehensive, and provocative account of presidential party leadership in the turbulent 1960s. Using many primary sources, including resources from presidential libraries, state and national archival material, public opinion polls, and numerous interviews, Sean J. Savage reveals for the first time the influence of Presidents John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson on the chairmanship, operations, structure, and finances of the Democratic National Committee. Savage further enriches his account with telephone conversations recently released from the Kennedy and Johnson presidential libraries, along with rare photos of JFK and LBJ."--BOOK JACKET.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E841 .S28 2004 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001777473
Browsing University of Texas At Tyler Shelves , Shelving location: Stacks - 3rd Floor Close shelf browser
E841 .P35 1975 The promise and the performance : E841 .R43 1997 Reassessing the sixties : E841 .S2 With Kennedy. E841 .S28 2004 JFK, LBJ, and the Democratic Party / E841 .S3 A thousand days : E841 .S6 Kennedy / E841 .T29 2007 Brothers :

Includes bibliographical references (p. 405-412) and index.

JFK and his party -- LBJ and his party -- The 1960 election : rivals and allies -- The party politics of public policy -- JFK, LBJ, and the DNC -- The politics of consensus : 1962-1964 -- The politics of dissensus : 1966-1968.

"JFK, LBJ, and the Democratic Party is a detailed, comprehensive, and provocative account of presidential party leadership in the turbulent 1960s. Using many primary sources, including resources from presidential libraries, state and national archival material, public opinion polls, and numerous interviews, Sean J. Savage reveals for the first time the influence of Presidents John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson on the chairmanship, operations, structure, and finances of the Democratic National Committee. Savage further enriches his account with telephone conversations recently released from the Kennedy and Johnson presidential libraries, along with rare photos of JFK and LBJ."--BOOK JACKET.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

There exists a large body of works dealing with the administrations of John F. Kennedy and Lyndon Johnson. Most seek to contrast the style of JFK with that of LBJ. Kennedy is depicted as more skeptical of proposals, while Johnson is seen as egotistical and headstrong on issues from the poverty program to Vietnam. Instead of studying both presidents separately, Savage (Saint Mary's College) looks at them jointly and within the context of the Democratic Party, producing an outstanding work that often debunks the stereotypes applied to each president. He finds that JFK was a far more successful legislative leader than his reputation suggested, and that Johnson was less unprincipled than depicted. If nothing else, Savage places JFK firmly in the middle of the Democratic Party and LBJ a bit on the conservative side, especially at the latter stage. The author describes a party in transition, trying to practice the politics of consensus and ending up at the politics of "dissensus." This masterful work should spark an interest in studying the politics of the sixties in a broader context than just presidential personalities. ^BSumming Up: Essential. All levels/libraries. D. R. Turner Davis and Elkins College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Sean J. Savage is Associate Professor of Political Science at Saint Mary's College in Notre Dame.

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