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Bleeding Kansas : contested liberty in the Civil War era / Nicole Etcheson.

By: Etcheson, Nicole.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Lawrence : University Press of Kansas, c2004Description: xiv, 370 p. : ill., map ; 24 cm.ISBN: 0700612874 (cloth : alk. paper); 9780700612871 (cloth : alk. paper); 0700614923; 9780700614929.Subject(s): United States. Kansas-Nebraska Act | United States -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- Causes | Kansas -- Politics and government -- 1854-1861 | United States -- Politics and government -- 1849-1861 | Slavery -- Political aspects -- Kansas -- History -- 19th century | African Americans -- Civil rights -- Kansas -- History -- 19th century | Violence -- Kansas -- History -- 19th century | Kansas -- Race relations | United States -- Race relationsAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Bleeding Kansas.; Online version:: Bleeding Kansas.DDC classification: 973.7/113 LOC classification: E433 | .E83 2004Other classification: 15.85 | NP 6020
Contents:
The triumph of squatter sovereignty: the Kansas-Nebraska Act -- Freedom in the scale: the migration to Kansas territory -- All right on the hemp: the territorial legislature -- We are but slaves: the free-state movement -- The war commences in earnest: bleeding Kansas -- We fight to free white men: the Guerrilla War of 1856 -- Imposing a Constitution against their will: the Lecompton Constitution -- The language of a freeman: the english compromise -- A fruit of the Kansas tree: the Harpers Ferry raid -- I am here for revenge: the national civil war.
Review: "Bleeding Kansas is a gripping account of events and people - rabble-rousing Jim Lane, zealot John Brown, Sheriff Sam Jones, and others - that examines the social milieu of the settlers along with the political ideas they developed. Covering the period from the 1854 Kansas-Nebraska Act to the 1879 Exoduster migration, it traces the complex interactions among groups inside and outside the territory, creating a comprehensive political, social, and intellectual history of this tumultuous period in the state's history."--Jacket.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E433 .E83 2004 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001774173

Includes bibliographical references (p. 329-350) and index.

The triumph of squatter sovereignty: the Kansas-Nebraska Act -- Freedom in the scale: the migration to Kansas territory -- All right on the hemp: the territorial legislature -- We are but slaves: the free-state movement -- The war commences in earnest: bleeding Kansas -- We fight to free white men: the Guerrilla War of 1856 -- Imposing a Constitution against their will: the Lecompton Constitution -- The language of a freeman: the english compromise -- A fruit of the Kansas tree: the Harpers Ferry raid -- I am here for revenge: the national civil war.

"Bleeding Kansas is a gripping account of events and people - rabble-rousing Jim Lane, zealot John Brown, Sheriff Sam Jones, and others - that examines the social milieu of the settlers along with the political ideas they developed. Covering the period from the 1854 Kansas-Nebraska Act to the 1879 Exoduster migration, it traces the complex interactions among groups inside and outside the territory, creating a comprehensive political, social, and intellectual history of this tumultuous period in the state's history."--Jacket.

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CHOICE Review

Historians have long seen the Kansas-Nebraska Act as the law that reopened the debate on slavery in the territories and set in motion the chain of events leading to the Civil War. Focusing on popular sovereignty, Etcheson (Univ. of Texas, El Paso) identifies Kansans' concern for white liberty as the polarizing force that made Kansas bleed. Proslavery advocates, through the use of election fraud, violence, and the complicity of the Pierce Administration, won control of the territorial government and attempted to silence those who opposed the "peculiar institution." Feeling that popular sovereignty had been subverted and their liberties violated, free-state supporters resorted to violence and extra-legal action. The resulting conflict devastated Kansas and divided the nation. It would also lead many free-state Kansans to broaden their definition of liberty to include African Americans and influence the development of the state during the war and Reconstruction. In many respects, Etcheson traces in Kansas the same sort of transformation that James McPherson portrayed as occurring in the country as a whole in Battle Cry of Freedom (CH, Jul'88). All libraries with collections in US history should purchase this lively political history. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. All levels. D. Butts Gordon College (GA)

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