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The fall of France : the Nazi invasion of 1940 / Julian Jackson.

By: Jackson, Julian, 1954-.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Making of the modern world (Oxford University Press): Publisher: Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2003Description: xvii, 274 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.ISBN: 019280300X; 9780192803009; 0192805509; 9780192805508.Subject(s): World War, 1939-1945 -- Campaigns -- FranceDDC classification: 940.54/214 | 944.0816 Other classification: 15.70
Contents:
1. 'We Are Beaten' -- 16 May 1940: Churchill in Paris -- The Mysterious General Gamelin -- 'Ready for War': Tanks and Guns -- The Air Force -- French Military Doctrine: 'Retired on Mount Sinai'? -- Fighting in Belgium: The Dyle Plan -- The Matador's Cloak -- The Allied Order of Battle -- 10-15 May: Into Belgium -- 10-12 May: Through the Ardennes -- 13 May: The Germans Cross the Meuse -- 14-15: The Counter-attack Fails: The Tragic Fate of the Three DCRs -- 17-18 May: The Tortoise Head -- 19-20 May: 'Without Wishing to Intervene ... ': The End of Gamelin -- 2. Uneasy Allies -- 21 May 1940: Weygand in Ypres -- Looking for Allies: 1920-1938 -- Elusive Albion: Britain and France 1919-1939 -- The Alliance That Never Was -- Gamelin's Disappointments: Poland, Belgium, Britain -- Britain and France in the Phoney War -- 10-22 May: 'Allied to so Temperamental a Race' -- 22-25 May: The 'Weygand Plan' -- The Belgian Capitulation -- 26 May-4 June: Operation Dynamo -- After Dunkirk: 'In Mourning For Us' -- 3. The Politics of Defeat -- 12 June 1940: Paul Reynaud at Cange (Loire) -- The French Civil War -- 'Rather Hitler than Blum? -- April 1938-September 1939: The Daladier Government -- Daladier at War -- Reynaud v. Daladier -- Reynaud at War -- 25-28 May: Weygand's Proposal -- 29 May-9 June: Reynaud's Alternative -- 12-16 June: Reynaud v. Weygand -- 16 June: Reynaud's Resignation -- 4. The French People at War -- 17 June 1940: Georges Friedmann in Niort -- Remembering 1914 -- A Pacifist Nation -- Going to War: 'Something between Resolution and Resignation' -- Phoney War Blues -- Why Are We Fighting? -- The French Army in 1940 -- Soldiers at War I: 'Confident and Full of Hope' -- Soldiers at War II: 'The Germans Are at Bulson' (13 May) -- Soldiers at War III: The 'Molecular Disintegration' of the 71DI -- The Exodus -- Soldiers at War IV: 'Sans esprit de recul' (5-10 June) -- 5. Causes and Counterfactuals -- July 1940: Marc Bloch in Gueret -- Historians and the Defeat -- Counterfactuals I: 1914 -- Counterfactuals II: Britain's Finest Hour -- The Other Side of the Hill: Germany -- Explaining Defeat: 'Moving in a Kind of Fog' -- Army and Society -- 6. Consequences -- June 1940: Francois Mitterrand at Verdun: 'No Need to Say More' -- Vichy: The Lessons of Defeat -- 'Fulcrum of the Twentieth Century' -- Gaullism and 1940 -- National Renewal after 1945 -- 1940 and Colonial Nostalgia -- 1940 Today.
Review: "Using eyewitness accounts, memoirs, and diaries, Julian Jackson recreates, in detail, the intense atmosphere and dramatic events of these six weeks in 1940, unravelling the historical evidence to produce a fresh answer to the perennial question of whether the defeat of France was inevitable."--Jacket.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
D755.2 .J23 2004 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001775444
Browsing University of Texas At Tyler Shelves , Shelving location: Stacks - 3rd Floor Close shelf browser
D754.S7 H3 Wartime mission in Spain, 1942-1945, D754 .S9 R4413 2009 Faces of neutrality : D755.1 .B43 1973 The war Hitler won: D755.2 .J23 2004 The fall of France : D755.7 .D36 2005 1945 : D755.7 .D613 The decline and fall of Nazi Germany and Imperial Japan; D755.7 .T6 The last 100 days.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

1. 'We Are Beaten' -- 16 May 1940: Churchill in Paris -- The Mysterious General Gamelin -- 'Ready for War': Tanks and Guns -- The Air Force -- French Military Doctrine: 'Retired on Mount Sinai'? -- Fighting in Belgium: The Dyle Plan -- The Matador's Cloak -- The Allied Order of Battle -- 10-15 May: Into Belgium -- 10-12 May: Through the Ardennes -- 13 May: The Germans Cross the Meuse -- 14-15: The Counter-attack Fails: The Tragic Fate of the Three DCRs -- 17-18 May: The Tortoise Head -- 19-20 May: 'Without Wishing to Intervene ... ': The End of Gamelin -- 2. Uneasy Allies -- 21 May 1940: Weygand in Ypres -- Looking for Allies: 1920-1938 -- Elusive Albion: Britain and France 1919-1939 -- The Alliance That Never Was -- Gamelin's Disappointments: Poland, Belgium, Britain -- Britain and France in the Phoney War -- 10-22 May: 'Allied to so Temperamental a Race' -- 22-25 May: The 'Weygand Plan' -- The Belgian Capitulation -- 26 May-4 June: Operation Dynamo -- After Dunkirk: 'In Mourning For Us' -- 3. The Politics of Defeat -- 12 June 1940: Paul Reynaud at Cange (Loire) -- The French Civil War -- 'Rather Hitler than Blum? -- April 1938-September 1939: The Daladier Government -- Daladier at War -- Reynaud v. Daladier -- Reynaud at War -- 25-28 May: Weygand's Proposal -- 29 May-9 June: Reynaud's Alternative -- 12-16 June: Reynaud v. Weygand -- 16 June: Reynaud's Resignation -- 4. The French People at War -- 17 June 1940: Georges Friedmann in Niort -- Remembering 1914 -- A Pacifist Nation -- Going to War: 'Something between Resolution and Resignation' -- Phoney War Blues -- Why Are We Fighting? -- The French Army in 1940 -- Soldiers at War I: 'Confident and Full of Hope' -- Soldiers at War II: 'The Germans Are at Bulson' (13 May) -- Soldiers at War III: The 'Molecular Disintegration' of the 71DI -- The Exodus -- Soldiers at War IV: 'Sans esprit de recul' (5-10 June) -- 5. Causes and Counterfactuals -- July 1940: Marc Bloch in Gueret -- Historians and the Defeat -- Counterfactuals I: 1914 -- Counterfactuals II: Britain's Finest Hour -- The Other Side of the Hill: Germany -- Explaining Defeat: 'Moving in a Kind of Fog' -- Army and Society -- 6. Consequences -- June 1940: Francois Mitterrand at Verdun: 'No Need to Say More' -- Vichy: The Lessons of Defeat -- 'Fulcrum of the Twentieth Century' -- Gaullism and 1940 -- National Renewal after 1945 -- 1940 and Colonial Nostalgia -- 1940 Today.

"Using eyewitness accounts, memoirs, and diaries, Julian Jackson recreates, in detail, the intense atmosphere and dramatic events of these six weeks in 1940, unravelling the historical evidence to produce a fresh answer to the perennial question of whether the defeat of France was inevitable."--Jacket.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

In May 1940, the German army punched through the Ardennes Forest and in less than a month's time swept aside two French armies and shoved the fumbling remnants of the British and French forces into the English Channel at Dunkirk. It was a staggering defeat for the Allied cause and gave impetus to Hitler's drive for world domination. Writers ever since have been trying to explain this monumental defeat. None does it better than Jackson (history, Univ. of Swansea). Through an exhaustive analysis of diaries, memoirs, public documents, and every secondary work on the subject, Jackson challenges conventional explanations for the French army's collapse. He contends that France's humiliating defeat was not the result of deep systemic factors, a theory favored by such authors as William Shirer. Instead, it was the boldness of a tactical strike that the Germans happened to aim at the weakest link in the Allied defenses. An extreme version of this theory was first offered in Ernest May's Strange Victory: Hitler's Conquest of France, but Jackson offers a far more in-depth analysis. This book is a fitting introduction to Jackson's critically acclaimed France: The Dark Years 1940-44 and belongs in every academic and public library.-Jim Doyle, Sara Hightower Regional Lib., Rome, GA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

The fall of France in 1940 and the ramifications of this catastrophe form the subject of Jackson's powerful book. In 1940, the speed and totality of the collapse of the French armies puzzled contemporaries. Jackson (Univ. of Swansea) examines this military defeat and its causes and consequences for France and for the world. He argues that the fall of France was an event of global consequences, turning a limited European conflict into a global war. Mussolini was emboldened to declare war on France, and the Japanese moved into Indochina. Even Joseph Stalin realized the significance of the French defeat. Germany's victory destroyed not only a political system but also an alliance. Jackson argues that Germany's great advantage was not blitzkrieg but surprise; in particular, launching an attack through the Ardennes. France also suffered a massive failure of military intelligence, even though the nation was better prepared for war in 1940 than in 1914. Jackson makes excellent use of memoirs, diaries, and private papers in presenting a riveting account of the history of this world-shaking defeat. A necessary addition to every WW II collection. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. All levels/collections. K. Eubank emeritus, CUNY Queens College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Julian Jackson is Professor of French History at the University of Wales, Swansea.

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