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Postwar : a history of Europe since 1945 / Tony Judt.

By: Judt, Tony.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Penguin Press, 2005Description: xv, 878 p., [24] p. of plates : ill., maps ; 25 cm.ISBN: 9781594200656; 1594200653.Subject(s): Europe -- History -- 1945-DDC classification: 940.55 LOC classification: D1051 | .J84 2005Other classification: 15.70 | NQ 5820 | NQ 5870
Contents:
1: Post-war: 1945-1953 -- The legacy of war -- Retribution -- The rehabilitation of Europe -- The impossible settlement -- The coming of the cold war -- Into the whirlwind -- Culture wars -- The end of old Europe -- 2: Prosperity and its discontents: 1953-1971 -- The politics of stability -- Lost illusions -- The age of affluence -- The social democratic hour -- The spectre of revolution -- The end of the affair -- 3: Recessional: 1971-1989 -- Diminished expectations -- Politics in a new key -- A time of transition -- The new realism -- The power of the powerless -- The end of the old order -- 4: After the fall: 1989-2005 -- A fissile continent -- The reckoning -- The old Europe--and the new -- The varieties of Europe -- Europe as a way of life -- From the house of the dead: an essay on modern European memory.
Summary: The first truly European history of contemporary Europe, from Lisbon to Leningrad, based on research in six languages, covering 34 countries across 60 years, using a great deal of material from newly available sources. The book integrates international relations, domestic politics, ideas, social change, economic development, and culture--high and low--into a single grand narrative. Every country has its chance to play the lead, and although the big themes are handled--including the cold war, the love/hate relationship with America, cultural and economic malaise and rebirth, and the myth and reality of unification--none of them is allowed to overshadow the rich pageant that is the whole.--From publisher description.
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Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
D1051 .J84 2005 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001775709

Includes bibliographical references and index.

1: Post-war: 1945-1953 -- The legacy of war -- Retribution -- The rehabilitation of Europe -- The impossible settlement -- The coming of the cold war -- Into the whirlwind -- Culture wars -- The end of old Europe -- 2: Prosperity and its discontents: 1953-1971 -- The politics of stability -- Lost illusions -- The age of affluence -- The social democratic hour -- The spectre of revolution -- The end of the affair -- 3: Recessional: 1971-1989 -- Diminished expectations -- Politics in a new key -- A time of transition -- The new realism -- The power of the powerless -- The end of the old order -- 4: After the fall: 1989-2005 -- A fissile continent -- The reckoning -- The old Europe--and the new -- The varieties of Europe -- Europe as a way of life -- From the house of the dead: an essay on modern European memory.

The first truly European history of contemporary Europe, from Lisbon to Leningrad, based on research in six languages, covering 34 countries across 60 years, using a great deal of material from newly available sources. The book integrates international relations, domestic politics, ideas, social change, economic development, and culture--high and low--into a single grand narrative. Every country has its chance to play the lead, and although the big themes are handled--including the cold war, the love/hate relationship with America, cultural and economic malaise and rebirth, and the myth and reality of unification--none of them is allowed to overshadow the rich pageant that is the whole.--From publisher description.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Judt (European studies, NYU; The Burden of Responsibility), a prolific and respected historian of recent Europe, has written a massive but nonetheless lively and thoughtful historical overview of today's Europe from the end of World War II through the economic, social, cultural, and political changes and continuities of the last 60 years. He includes the entire European continent in his consideration, and for American readers his view through this lens may serve to render familiar events differently, adding new dimensions to the America-focused narratives of the postwar years. From its opening chapter, a moving account of the devastation of Europe at the end of World War II, through the thoughtful analysis of the patterns and temper of the "The Old Europe and the New," which provides the closing chapter, this book gives a well-rounded picture of the trends, events, and people that have made contemporary Europe. In less capable hands, it would have been easy for such a huge and all-encompassing work to become a boring slog through names, places, and events. But Judt sees the bigger picture and conveys it ably, making the book lively enough to be read from cover to cover. Not all historians will agree with every one of Judt's assertions, but this book is certain to be a major addition to postwar European studies. For all collections. [See Prepub Alert, LJ 6/15/05; for an interview with Judt, see "Fall Editor's Picks," LJ 9/1/05.-Ed.]-Barbara Walden, Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

If such a massive and complex work as this can be said to have a thesis, it is found in the book's title. Developments in Europe since 1945 can best be understood as a reaction to the death and devastation wrought by WW II. Even ideas that trace their origins to the prewar years, such as centralized economic planning and European unity, only became manifest in response to the destruction caused by the war. Judt (New York Univ.) even traces the current misunderstanding between Americans and Europeans to the immediate postwar years. The centrality of the WW II experience is just one, although arguably the most important, of the themes Judt develops. He also does an excellent job relating the diversity of Europe. Unlike so many other authors, Judt does not give short shrift to smaller countries such as Switzerland, the Netherlands, or the Scandinavian nations. It is simply impossible to relate the richness of this outstanding book, which deals with an entire continent over a period of some 60 years. Postwar deserves to become the standard English-language history of Europe since 1945. ^BSumming Up: Essential. All public and academic levels/libraries. R. W. Lemmons Jacksonville State University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Tony Judt was born in London, England on January 2, 1948. He was educated at King's College, Cambridge University and the École Normale Supérieure, Paris. He taught at numerous colleges and universities including Cambridge University; St. Anne's College, Oxford; the University of California, Berkeley and New York University. He was the author or editor off over fifteen books including Ill Fares the Land, Reappraisals: Reflections on the Forgotten Twentieth Century, and Postwar: A History of Europe Since 1945, which won the Council on Foreign Relations Arthur Ross Book Award. He was also a frequent contributor to numerous journals including The New York Review of Books, the Times Literary Supplement, The New Republic, and The New York Times. He was diagnosed with ALS in 2008. He died on August 6, 2010 at the age of 62. <p> (Bowker Author Biography)

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