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Pursuits of happiness : the social development of early modern British colonies and the formation of American culture / Jack P. Greene.

By: Greene, Jack P.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, c1988Description: xv, 284 p. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 0807818046 (alk. paper); 9780807818046 (alk. paper); 0807842273 (pbk. : alk. paper); 9780807842270 (pbk. : alk. paper).Subject(s): Great Britain -- Colonies -- America -- History | United States -- Social conditions -- To 1865 | United States -- Civilization -- To 1783 | United States Colonisation by Great Britain, 1607-1775DDC classification: 306/.0973 Other classification: NQ 9410 | HD 475 | NN 7500
Contents:
Two models of English colonization, 1600-1660 -- Reconsiderations -- A declension model : New England, 1660-1760 -- A developmental model : the Chesapeake, 1660-1760 -- Exemplar and variation : Britain and Ireland, 1660-1760 -- Variations : the middle colonies and the lower South, 1710-1760 -- Variations : the Atlantic and Caribbean islands, 1660-1760 -- Convergence : development of an American society, 1720-1780.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
HN50 .G74 1988 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001775071

Bibliography: p. 211-265.

Includes index.

Two models of English colonization, 1600-1660 -- Reconsiderations -- A declension model : New England, 1660-1760 -- A developmental model : the Chesapeake, 1660-1760 -- Exemplar and variation : Britain and Ireland, 1660-1760 -- Variations : the middle colonies and the lower South, 1710-1760 -- Variations : the Atlantic and Caribbean islands, 1660-1760 -- Convergence : development of an American society, 1720-1780.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Greene here questions the long-held assumption of scholars that American culture originated in the New England colonies. This view is based upon the notion that the experience of Colonial New England was normative, while development in the southern colonies was deviant. Greene challenges this interpretation, noting that until the last three decades few scholars showed any interest in the question. Others lacked sufficient evidence to make definitive assessments on the relative importance of any of the colonies to American cultural development. Greene argues that recent demographic and cultural studies of the American Colonial period indicates that southern colonies and states, before 1800, were actually in the mainstream of British-American development. He concludes that the southern colonies epitomized the American ideal of the pursuit of happiness by an independet people in a setting that provided significant opportunity for success. This book should be compared with works such as Sacvan Bercovitch's Puritan Origins of the American Self (CH, Feb '76), which present the importance of the Puritan influence. Recommended for public and academic libraries, community college level up. R. M. Jellison Miami University (OH)

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