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Affairs of honor : national politics in the New Republic / Joanne B. Freeman.

By: Freeman, Joanne B, 1962-.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New Haven : Yale Nota Bene, 2002, c2001Edition: 1st Yale Nota Bene ed.Description: xxiv, 376 p. : ill. ; 20 cm.ISBN: 0300097557 (pbk.); 9780300097559 (pbk.).Subject(s): United States -- Politics and government -- 1789-1815 | Political culture -- United States -- History -- 18th century | Politics and culture -- United States -- History -- 18th century | United States -- Social conditions -- To 1865 | Elite (Social sciences) -- Political activity -- United States -- History -- 18th century | Honor -- Political aspects -- United States -- History -- 18th centuryDDC classification: 973.4 Other classification: 15.85 | NO 2300 | PW 9300 Summary: Annotation Offering a reassessment of the tumultuous culture of politics on the national stage during America's early years, when Jefferson, Burr, and Hamilton were among the national leaders, Freeman shows how the rituals and rhetoric of honor provides ground rules for political combat. Illustrations.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E310 .F85 2002 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001967595
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E310 .F85 2002 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001774504

Originally published in hardcover 2001.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 347-364) and index.

Annotation Offering a reassessment of the tumultuous culture of politics on the national stage during America's early years, when Jefferson, Burr, and Hamilton were among the national leaders, Freeman shows how the rituals and rhetoric of honor provides ground rules for political combat. Illustrations.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Building on the work of Douglass Adair and Bertram Wyatt-Brown, Freeman (history, Yale Univ.) asserts that in the early national period of the US, the political elite, confronted by a growing democracy and the egalitarian aspects of republicanism, embraced a culture of honor to prove themselves as leaders. Indeed, she argues that the honor culture formed the very infrastructure of a national politics of shifting coalitions and changing loyalties, providing stability to the system. "Forging, defending, and attacking reputations--this was the national political game." These goals were accomplished in various ways, including verbal and written political gossip. Dueling, an extreme threat, was deliberately used in times of crisis as proof of character. Freeman especially analyzes the statements and actions of William Maclay, Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, and Aaron Burr, and in the concluding chapter weaves together many of the book's themes in a case study of the presidential election of 1800. Overall, Freeman offers numerous useful insights, but certainly debatable is her assertion that the culture of honor was a source of stability in the political world. Recommended for general readers and all academic levels. S. E. Siry Baldwin-Wallace College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Joanne B. Freeman is assistant professor of history at Yale University. She recently appeared in the PBS American Experience documentary "The Duel", exploring the fatal 1804 clash between Burr and Hamilton. <p> (Bowker Author Biography)

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