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The new Black middle class / Bart Landry.

By: Landry, Bart.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Berkeley : University of California Press, c1987Description: xi, 250 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.ISBN: 0520059425 (alk. paper); 9780520059429 (alk. paper); 0520064658 (pbk); 9780520064652 (pbk).Subject(s): African Americans -- Social conditions -- 1975- | Middle class -- United States | United States -- Race relations | United States Middle class black persons Social aspectsDDC classification: 305.8/96073 Other classification: 71.12
Contents:
Introduction: Middle-Class Blacks and the American Dream -- The Old Black Middle Class: Dilemma of Race in a Class Society -- The New Black Middle Class: Has Race Been Eclipsed? -- Moving On Up: At Last a Piece of the Pie -- How Big a Piece? -- Life in the Middle: In Pursuit of the American Dream -- Consumption: Where, What, and How Much -- Life Style: And the Living Is Easy, or Is It? -- The New Black Middle Class in the 1980s: Checking Its Vital Signs.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E185.86 .L35 1987 (Browse shelf) Available 0000000405985

Bibliography: p. 235-246.

Introduction: Middle-Class Blacks and the American Dream -- The Old Black Middle Class: Dilemma of Race in a Class Society -- The New Black Middle Class: Has Race Been Eclipsed? -- Moving On Up: At Last a Piece of the Pie -- How Big a Piece? -- Life in the Middle: In Pursuit of the American Dream -- Consumption: Where, What, and How Much -- Life Style: And the Living Is Easy, or Is It? -- The New Black Middle Class in the 1980s: Checking Its Vital Signs.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Since its publication in the 1950s, E. Franklin Frazier's The Black Bourgeoisie has been the standard work on the black middle class. Landry's book on blacks in middle-class America both supplements and supercedes Frazier's work. Utilizing data he compiled in 1976 as well as 1970 and 1980 census statistics, Landry (Sociology, Univ. of Maryland) documents what he labels the ``new'' black middle class and concludes its future faces uncertain growth. He emphasizes the widening economic gap between the white and black middle class. Still, he is hopeful. Although he depends heavily on data now a decade old, he also synthesizes much of the secondary literature since Frazier. Only time and extensive scholarly appraisal will tell how this compares with Frazier's work, but it deserves serious attention. Highly recommended. Boyd Childress, Auburn Univ. Lib., Ala. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

Landry combines the results of a 1976 survey of middle-class blacks with historical data from public sources to describe the emergence and life-style of a new black middle class. The national prosperity of the 1960s, in concert with the Civil Rights Movement, provided the socioeconomic setting for growth in both the range and sheer number of occupational opportunities for the constituents of this new class. According to Landry, the great strides of blacks during the 1960s and 1970s were halted during the early 1980s, and the racial gap in earnings, wealth, and consumption/life-style indicators for middle-class Americans has grown. Landry's work is the most recent in a series of books and articles on race, occupations, and public policy. Although he challenges many of William Julius Wilson's positions as indicated in his The Declining Significance of Race (2nd ed., 1980), Landry does not address the highly contentious and influential views of George Gilder (e.g., Wealth and Poverty, CH, Apr '81) and Charles Murray (e.g., Losing Ground, CH, Feb '85). The book is well written and is most appropriate for collections in social class and race relations. Recommended for upper-division undergraduates, graduate students, and faculty.-K.B. Smith, Lamar University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Bart Landry is Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of Maryland

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