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Buried in the bitter waters : the hidden history of racial cleansing in America / Elliot Jaspin.

By: Jaspin, Elliot.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Basic Books, c2007Description: vii, 341 p. : ill., maps ; 25 cm.ISBN: 9780465036363 (hc : alk. paper); 0465036368 (hc : alk. paper).Subject(s): African Americans -- Segregation -- History | African Americans -- Relocation -- History | African Americans -- Crimes against -- History | African Americans -- Social conditions | Racism -- United States -- History | United States -- Race relationsDDC classification: 305.896/073
Contents:
1. We the people -- 2. McNeel's feet -- 3. Forced labor -- 4. Disturbing situations -- 5. "Don't kill us all" -- 6. All-white diversity -- 7. The burning cow -- 8. Something in the air -- 9. A dog named Nigger -- 10. The Horse Thief Detective Association -- 11. Bedtime stories -- 12. Lost, stolen, or strayed -- Conclusion : Esta's gift -- Notes -- Appendix A. Black population collapses -- Appendix B. Black Forsyth County landowners.
Summary: "'Leave now, or die!' From the heart of the Midwest to the Deep South, from the mountains of North Carolina to the Texas frontier, words like these have echoed through more than a century of American history. The call heralded not a tornado or a hurricane, but a very unnatural disaster--a man-made wave of racial cleansing that purged black populations from counties across the nation. We have long known about horrific episodes of lynching in the South, but the story of widespread racial cleansing--above and below the Mason-Dixon Line--has remained almost entirely unknown. Time after time, in the period between Reconstruction and the 1920s, whites banded together to drive out the blacks in their midst. They burned and killed indiscriminately and drove thousands from their homes, sweeping entire counties clear of blacks to make them racially "pure." The expulsions were swift--in many cases, it took no more than twenty-four hours to eliminate an entire African-American population. Shockingly, these areas remain virtually all-white to this day. Based on original interviews and nearly a decade of painstaking research in archives and census records, [this book] provides irrefutable evidence that racial cleansing occurred again and again on American soil and fundamentally reshaped the geography of race. In this groundbreaking book, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Elliot Jaspin has rewritten American history as we know it."--Publisher's description, from book jacket.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E185.61 .J37 2007 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001817873

Includes bibliographical references (p. 315-326) and index.

1. We the people -- 2. McNeel's feet -- 3. Forced labor -- 4. Disturbing situations -- 5. "Don't kill us all" -- 6. All-white diversity -- 7. The burning cow -- 8. Something in the air -- 9. A dog named Nigger -- 10. The Horse Thief Detective Association -- 11. Bedtime stories -- 12. Lost, stolen, or strayed -- Conclusion : Esta's gift -- Notes -- Appendix A. Black population collapses -- Appendix B. Black Forsyth County landowners.

"'Leave now, or die!' From the heart of the Midwest to the Deep South, from the mountains of North Carolina to the Texas frontier, words like these have echoed through more than a century of American history. The call heralded not a tornado or a hurricane, but a very unnatural disaster--a man-made wave of racial cleansing that purged black populations from counties across the nation. We have long known about horrific episodes of lynching in the South, but the story of widespread racial cleansing--above and below the Mason-Dixon Line--has remained almost entirely unknown. Time after time, in the period between Reconstruction and the 1920s, whites banded together to drive out the blacks in their midst. They burned and killed indiscriminately and drove thousands from their homes, sweeping entire counties clear of blacks to make them racially "pure." The expulsions were swift--in many cases, it took no more than twenty-four hours to eliminate an entire African-American population. Shockingly, these areas remain virtually all-white to this day. Based on original interviews and nearly a decade of painstaking research in archives and census records, [this book] provides irrefutable evidence that racial cleansing occurred again and again on American soil and fundamentally reshaped the geography of race. In this groundbreaking book, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Elliot Jaspin has rewritten American history as we know it."--Publisher's description, from book jacket.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

The term cleansing used in relation to groups of people has come to convey an ugly reality Americans usually associate with distant places. Here, however, Pulitzer Prize-winning Cox Newspapers editor Jaspin dredges up the ugly reality of white Americans, from the late 1860s through the 1930s,"cleansing" their living and working spaces to make them white-only enclaves. Using census data, Jaspin reveals a whiting-out pattern in about one in 12 of the 3100 U.S. counties. Beyond statistics, he re-creates the stories of rural towns, villages, and whole counties emptying themselves of blacks. He shows vigilantes at work, but more than mobs made this unsavory history. In everyday community activities, whites worked to drive blacks out, and keep them out, of their American dream. Jaspin gives context to accounts of whites destroying single black communities, such as Alfred L. Brophy's excellent Reconstructing the Dreamland, about the 1921 Greenwood district of Tulsa, OK, or the various treatments of Rosewood, FL, in 1922. Critics will quibble about whites' motives, but Jaspin's facts are dauntingly indisputable. Essential for collections on modern America, local history, and U.S. race relations.-Thomas J. Davis, Arizona State Univ., Tempe (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Elliot Jaspin is a reporter for Cox Newspapers, where he specializes in computer-assisted reporting. He won a Pulitzer Prize for reporting in 1979, and in 1993 he was awarded the Kiplinger Distinguished Contributions to Journalism Award by the National Press Foundation. He lives in Annapolis, Maryland.

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