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Unnatural voices: extreme narration in modern and contemporary fiction / Brian Richardson.

By: Richardson, Brian, 1953-.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Theory and interpretation of narrative series: Publisher: Columbus : Ohio State University Press, c2006Description: xiii, 166 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 9780814210413 (cloth : alk. paper); 0814210414 (cloth : alk. paper); 9780814251577 (pbk. : alk. paper); 0814251579 (pbk. : alk. paper); 9780814291191 (cd-rom); 0814291198 (cd-rom).Subject(s): Fiction -- Technique | Narration (Rhetoric) | Fiction -- 20th century -- History and criticism | Fiction -- 19th century -- History and criticismAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Unnatural voices: extreme narration in modern and contemporary fiction.DDC classification: 809.3/83 Other classification: 17.86
Contents:
Introduction: Transgressing self and voice-contemporary fiction and the death of the narrator -- "At first you feel a bit lost": the varieties of second person narration -- Class and consciousness: "We" narration from Conrad to postcolonial fiction -- I, etcetera: multiperson narration and the range of contemporary narrators -- Three extreme forms of narration and a note on postmodern unreliability -- Unnatural narration in contemporary drama -- Implied authors, historical authors, and the transparent narrator: toward a new model of the narrative transaction -- Conclusion: Voicing the unspeakable.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
PN3383.N35 R53 2006 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001826445

Includes bibliographical references (p. 151-160) and index.

Introduction: Transgressing self and voice-contemporary fiction and the death of the narrator -- "At first you feel a bit lost": the varieties of second person narration -- Class and consciousness: "We" narration from Conrad to postcolonial fiction -- I, etcetera: multiperson narration and the range of contemporary narrators -- Three extreme forms of narration and a note on postmodern unreliability -- Unnatural narration in contemporary drama -- Implied authors, historical authors, and the transparent narrator: toward a new model of the narrative transaction -- Conclusion: Voicing the unspeakable.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

As the latest addition to the "Theory and Interpretation of Narrative" series, this book joins Emma Kafalenos's Narrative Causalities (CH, Jan'07, 44-2544) in its attempt to reframe understanding of narrative. Richardson's subject is the unconventional narrators characteristic of postmodern fiction, and his task is to develop an antimimetic poetics that can supplement traditional poetics in analyzing such nontraditional narratives. The kinds of narratives that defy traditional analysis, Richardson (Univ. of Maryland) argues, are not only those spoken by nonhuman characters but also human narratives that transgress conventional narratives, e.g., multiperson narratives, narratives presented in the first-person plural or the second person, narratives that engage in "denarration" (erasing that which has come before), and narratives spoken by permeable narrators (where narration, defying logic, is produced by several minds). Richardson analyzes the narrative methods of such authors as Alain Robbe-Grillet, Joseph Conrad, James Joyce, Samuel Beckett, Tom Stoppard, et al., locating some of the extreme techniques in earlier fiction and demonstrating how they have become typical of postmodern fiction. Despite the complex theoretical nature of the subject, this study is clearly organized and accessible even to those without substantial background in narrative theory or postmodern fiction. Summing Up: Recommended. Lower-/upper-division undergraduates through faculty. A. E. McKim St. Thomas University

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