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Picturing the New Negro : Harlem Renaissance print culture and modern black identity / Caroline Goeser.

By: Goeser, Caroline.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Culture America: Publisher: Lawrence, Kan. : University Press of Kansas, c2007Description: xiv, 360 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 0700614664 (cloth : alk. paper); 9780700614660 (cloth : alk. paper).Subject(s): African Americans in art | Illustration of books -- New York (State) -- New York -- 20th century | Magazine illustration -- New York (State) -- New York -- 20th century | African American illustrators -- New York (State) -- New York | Harlem RenaissanceAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Picturing the New Negro.DDC classification: 760/.04499730496073
Contents:
Introduction : making black modern in the medium of illustration -- An overview of Harlem Renaissance illustrations and their reception. Strategizing from spaces between : Aaron Douglas and the art of illustrating ; From racial uplift to vernacular expression : commercial and little magazine illustrations ; "Worth the price of the book" : dust jacket and book illustrations ; Critical ambivalence : illustration's reception in print -- Critical themes in Harlem Renaissance illustration. Remaking the past, making the modern : race, gender, and the modern economy ; Religion as "power site of cultural resistance" ; Black and tan : racial and sexual crossings in Ebony and topaz ; "To smile satirically" : on wearing the minstrel mask -- A brief conclusion : on making black modern during the Renaissance and beyond.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
NC961.7.A37 G64 2007 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001827278

Includes bibliographical references (p. 305-350) and index.

Introduction : making black modern in the medium of illustration -- An overview of Harlem Renaissance illustrations and their reception. Strategizing from spaces between : Aaron Douglas and the art of illustrating ; From racial uplift to vernacular expression : commercial and little magazine illustrations ; "Worth the price of the book" : dust jacket and book illustrations ; Critical ambivalence : illustration's reception in print -- Critical themes in Harlem Renaissance illustration. Remaking the past, making the modern : race, gender, and the modern economy ; Religion as "power site of cultural resistance" ; Black and tan : racial and sexual crossings in Ebony and topaz ; "To smile satirically" : on wearing the minstrel mask -- A brief conclusion : on making black modern during the Renaissance and beyond.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Goeser (Univ. of Houston) offers an important contribution to art history because it contains the first in-depth examination of African American illustration. Amy H. Kirschke's Art in Crisis (CH, Sep'07, 45-0074) is close on its heels. Known painters such as Aaron Douglas, Laura Wheeler Waring, and Albert Smith are discussed here as well as many other artists who do not appear in any surveys of African American art; however, their work was undoubtedly seen by more people than that of William H. Johnson or Horace Pippin. Goeser argues how these popular artists responded to and shaped views about contemporary racial politics and issues of identity for their audiences in the 1920s-30s. Though some of the author's readings optimistically interpret the use of racial conventions as subversive, other aspects of the book are very noteworthy. There are new, significant readings of Bruce Nugent's visual art in relation to his writing, and Goeser provides a fascinating window onto the interracial partnerships among illustrators, editors, and authors at both Knopf and Harper during that time. There are 90 black-and-white illustrations. Summing Up: Recommended. Lower-division undergraduates through professionals. K. N. Pinder School of the Art Institute of Chicago

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