The Barbary wars : American independence in the Atlantic world / Frank Lambert.

By: Lambert, Frank, 1943-Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Hill and Wang, 2005Edition: 1st edDescription: 228 p. : ill., maps ; 22 cmISBN: 0809095335 (hardcover : alk. paper); 9780809095339 (hardcover : alk. paper); 0809028115; 9780809028115Subject(s): United States -- History -- Tripolitan War, 1801-1805 | United States -- Relations -- Africa, North | Africa, North -- Relations -- United States | United States -- History -- War with Algeria, 1815 | United States -- Foreign relations -- 1783-1815 | Pirates -- Africa, North -- History -- 19th century | Pirates -- Mediterranean Region -- History -- 19th century | Africa, North -- History, Naval -- 19th century | Mediterranean Region -- History, Naval -- 19th centuryDDC classification: 973.4/7 LOC classification: E335 | .L36 2005Other classification: 15.85 | NO 2300
Contents:
The American Revolution checked -- Tribute or arms? -- Tributary to the Barbary States -- The cultural construction of the Barbary pirates -- The Tripolitan War : 1801-5 -- An uneasy peace : partisan debate and British harassment -- The Algerine war of 1815 and American independence in the Atlantic world.
Summary: Within a year of American independence, an American merchant ship was captured by state-sponsored pirates operating out of the ports of Morocco. Algerian pirates quickly seized two more ships: the boats were confiscated, their crews held captive, and ransom demanded of the fledgling American government. The history of America's conflict with the piratical states of the Mediterranean runs through the first four presidencies; the adoption of the Constitution; the Quasi-War with France and the War of 1812; the construction of a full-time professional navy; and, most important, the nation's halting steps toward commercial independence. Depicting a time when Britain ruled the seas and France most of Europe, this book shows that America's earliest conflict with the Arabic world was always a struggle for economic advantage rather than any clash of cultures or religions.--From publisher description.Summary: Includes information on the Algerine War (1815), Algiers Treaty (1795), Continental Congress, U.S. Congress, Stephen Decatur, Democratic-Republicans, William Eaton, Federalists, France, Benjamin Franklin, free trade, Great Britain, U.S. House of Representatives, Ali Hassan (dey of Algiers), Islam, John Jay, Thomas Jefferson, Yusuf Karamanli (bashaw of Tripoli), Koran, Tobias Lear, James Madison, mercantilism, Morocco Treaty, Navigation Acts, U.S. Navy, Netherlands, Richard O'Brien, Treaty of Paris, pirates, piracy, Portugal, Edward Preble, Sallee Rovers, U.S. Senate, slaves, slavery, Spain, Sweden, Tripoli, Tripoli Treaty, Tunis, war on terrorism, War of 1812, George Washington, etc.
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Book University of Texas At Tyler
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E335 .L36 2005 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001827377

Includes bibliographical references (p. [203]-216) and index.

The American Revolution checked -- Tribute or arms? -- Tributary to the Barbary States -- The cultural construction of the Barbary pirates -- The Tripolitan War : 1801-5 -- An uneasy peace : partisan debate and British harassment -- The Algerine war of 1815 and American independence in the Atlantic world.

Within a year of American independence, an American merchant ship was captured by state-sponsored pirates operating out of the ports of Morocco. Algerian pirates quickly seized two more ships: the boats were confiscated, their crews held captive, and ransom demanded of the fledgling American government. The history of America's conflict with the piratical states of the Mediterranean runs through the first four presidencies; the adoption of the Constitution; the Quasi-War with France and the War of 1812; the construction of a full-time professional navy; and, most important, the nation's halting steps toward commercial independence. Depicting a time when Britain ruled the seas and France most of Europe, this book shows that America's earliest conflict with the Arabic world was always a struggle for economic advantage rather than any clash of cultures or religions.--From publisher description.

Includes information on the Algerine War (1815), Algiers Treaty (1795), Continental Congress, U.S. Congress, Stephen Decatur, Democratic-Republicans, William Eaton, Federalists, France, Benjamin Franklin, free trade, Great Britain, U.S. House of Representatives, Ali Hassan (dey of Algiers), Islam, John Jay, Thomas Jefferson, Yusuf Karamanli (bashaw of Tripoli), Koran, Tobias Lear, James Madison, mercantilism, Morocco Treaty, Navigation Acts, U.S. Navy, Netherlands, Richard O'Brien, Treaty of Paris, pirates, piracy, Portugal, Edward Preble, Sallee Rovers, U.S. Senate, slaves, slavery, Spain, Sweden, Tripoli, Tripoli Treaty, Tunis, war on terrorism, War of 1812, George Washington, etc.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Lambert (history, Purdue Univ.; The Founding Fathers and the Place of Religion in America) argues that the Barbary Wars were an American struggle for the exercise of free trade rather than a battle between faiths or cultures, as they have been portrayed in other recent accounts seeking parallels with current American-Muslim entanglements. Lambert describes a United States separately embroiled with the armies of the French and the British and hampered by its virtual lack of a navy. As Lambert adeptly shows, the Barbary Wars changed all that. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

Lambert (Purdue Univ.) rejects the view that the Barbary Wars were a conflict between Islam and Christianity or a campaign against terrorism. Instead, he argues that the wars "were primarily about trade," and that in fighting Algiers, Tripoli, Tunis, and Morocco, Americans sought to extend to the Atlantic World the "principle of equality and reciprocity" for which they had fought the Revolution and adopted the Constitution. US leaders sought at the same time, but with little success, to obtain recognition of free trade principles from European powers. Lambert's political-economic approach contrasts with that of Robert J. Allison's The Crescent Obscured (CH, Dec'95, 33-2315), which focuses on US perceptions of Islam and the impact of Christians being held captive in North Africa on US attitudes toward domestic slavery; with Joshua E. London's Victory in Tripoli (2005), which depicts the Barbary Corsairs as terrorists; and with Glenn Tucker's Dawn like Thunder (1963), which recounts operations in the Barbary Wars in the context of the institutional development of the US Navy and Marine Corps. While containing little new information, Lambert's book is well written, its thesis well argued, and its perspective both fresh and important. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. All levels/libraries. J. C. Bradford Texas A&M University

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