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Women and the law of property in early America / Marylynn Salmon.

By: Salmon, Marylynn, 1951-.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Studies in legal history: Publisher: Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, c1986Description: xvii, 267 p. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 0807816876; 9780807816875; 9780807842447 (pbk.); 0807842443 (pbk.).Subject(s): Married women -- Legal status, laws, etc. -- United States -- History | Women -- Legal status, laws, etc. -- United States -- History | Separate property -- United States -- History | Married women Legal status, laws, etc United States History | Separate property United States History | Women Legal status, laws, etc United States HistoryAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Women and the law of property in early America.; Online version:: Women and the law of property in early America.DDC classification: 346.7304 | 347.3064 Other classification: 86.21
Contents:
Diversity in American law -- Conveyances -- Contracts -- Divorce and separation -- Separate estates -- Separate estates in New England -- Provisions for widows.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
KF524 .S24 1986 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001834183

Based on the author's thesis (Ph. D.).

Bibliography: p. 239-251.

Includes indexes.

Diversity in American law -- Conveyances -- Contracts -- Divorce and separation -- Separate estates -- Separate estates in New England -- Provisions for widows.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Salmon is among those now exploring the critical interface of law and society, legal and social change, perceiving the law as a powerful expression of social control. She focuses on women and property law between 1750 and 1830, especially conveyance and dower law, law of separate maintenance, law of separate estates, divorce and alimony law. Admittedly beset by the problem familiar to legal historians of the Colonial and post-Revolutionary periods (i.e., the colony-by-colony/state-by-state variation in constitutional text and legal practice), Salmon finds marked regional diversity as well. Salmon concludes that New England lawmakers gave male heads of household greater control over family property, including what wives inherited or earned, than elsewhere. Surprisingly, they were also more liberal in statutes granting divorce than in the South. The Revolution eventually brought marked shifts, granting women greater rights to family property and, of course, abolished primogeniture. Enforced dependence remained the rule, however; no colony or state allowed married women the legal right to independent action in regard to property. Still, the Revolution and the republican ideology it fostered promoted legal change for women, though some of the consequences were not apparent until the 1840s. A luminous study of law and society, Salmon's book is in the best scholarly tradition, a model of its kind. University libraries.-M. Cantor, University of Massachusetts at Amherst

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