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The unknown dead : civilians in the Battle of the Bulge / Peter Schrijvers.

By: Schrijvers, Peter, 1963-.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Lexington : University Press of Kentucky, c2005Description: xviii, 430 p. : ill., map ; 24 cm.ISBN: 0813123526 (hardcover : alk. paper); 9780813123523 (hardcover : alk. paper).Uniform titles: Wreed als ijs. English Subject(s): World War, 1939-1945 -- Casualties -- Belgium | World War, 1939-1945 -- Casualties -- Luxembourg | Ardennes, Battle of the, 1944-1945 | World War, 1939-1945 -- Personal narratives, Belgian | Civilian war casualties -- Belgium | Civilian war casualties -- LuxembourgAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Unknown dead.DDC classification: 940.53/161/0949348 LOC classification: D797.B4 | S3713 2005
Contents:
The northern shoulder -- The Peiper breakthrough -- Closing in on St. Vith -- The race for Bastogne -- The Houffalize corridor -- The southern shoulder -- The fall of St. Vith -- The siege of Bastogne -- Between the Salm and the Ourthe -- Between the Ourthe and the Meuse -- Counterattack from the south -- Lifting the siege of Bastogne -- Eliminating the bulge.
Summary: Traditional histories of the hard-fought Battle of the Bulge routinely include detailed lists of the casualties suffered by American, British, and German troops. Lacking in most accounts, however, are references to the civilians in Belgium and Luxembourg who lost their lives in the same battle. Yet the most reliable current estimates calculate the number of civilians who perished in the Ardennes in six weeks of fighting at approximately three thousand. The Unknown Dead tells the story of ordinary people caught up in the maelstrom of war. Historian Peter Schrijvers, a native Belgian, describes the war crimes committed by German military units on the front lines and by Nazi security services behind the battle lines, as well as the effects of Allied responses to the enemy threat, including massive bombings of small towns. Schrijvers also examines postwar concerns such as reconstruction, the formidable problem of abandoned land mines and explosives, and the occasionally emotional nature of relations between civilians and veterans. Based on recently discovered sources including numerous personal testimonies, municipal and parish records, and findings of the Belgian War Crimes Commission. --From publisher's description.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
D797.B4 S3713 2005 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001834134
Browsing University of Texas At Tyler Shelves , Shelving location: Stacks - 3rd Floor Close shelf browser
D790 .S625 1992 Flying the Hump : D792.J3 I513 The divine wind : D792 .P6 Z36 2004 The forgotten few : D797.B4 S3713 2005 The unknown dead : D802.A2 D28 2004 Dangerous liaisons : D802.A2 L45 Axis rule in occupied Europe; D802.A2 L57 1972B The patriotic traitors;

Includes bibliographical references and index.

The northern shoulder -- The Peiper breakthrough -- Closing in on St. Vith -- The race for Bastogne -- The Houffalize corridor -- The southern shoulder -- The fall of St. Vith -- The siege of Bastogne -- Between the Salm and the Ourthe -- Between the Ourthe and the Meuse -- Counterattack from the south -- Lifting the siege of Bastogne -- Eliminating the bulge.

Translated from the Dutch.

Traditional histories of the hard-fought Battle of the Bulge routinely include detailed lists of the casualties suffered by American, British, and German troops. Lacking in most accounts, however, are references to the civilians in Belgium and Luxembourg who lost their lives in the same battle. Yet the most reliable current estimates calculate the number of civilians who perished in the Ardennes in six weeks of fighting at approximately three thousand. The Unknown Dead tells the story of ordinary people caught up in the maelstrom of war. Historian Peter Schrijvers, a native Belgian, describes the war crimes committed by German military units on the front lines and by Nazi security services behind the battle lines, as well as the effects of Allied responses to the enemy threat, including massive bombings of small towns. Schrijvers also examines postwar concerns such as reconstruction, the formidable problem of abandoned land mines and explosives, and the occasionally emotional nature of relations between civilians and veterans. Based on recently discovered sources including numerous personal testimonies, municipal and parish records, and findings of the Belgian War Crimes Commission. --From publisher's description.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Schrijvers (Univ. of New South Wales) chronicles what might be referred to today as "collateral damage." His readers, however, will be unable to employ this euphemism, for the author details the truly horrific experience of Belgian and Luxembourg civilians during the Battle of the Bulge in December 1944-January 1945. The return of German military and security forces after the post-D-Day liberation in September 1944 shocked these civilians; trapped them between German and US forces; and unleashed incredible violence. Organized both chronologically and geographically, the book provides a day-by-day, village-by-village account of the suffering and death of civilians during artillery and aerial bombardments. Battles raged while they hid in cellars and attempted to aid and save each other, soldiers, and precious livestock. Schrijvers documents war crimes committed by German security and SS units, soldiers' mistrust and suspicion of civilians, the destruction of villages and livelihoods, and numerous instances of humane treatment in the midst of chaos. He admirably relates the stories of many of the estimated 3,000 dead and others, thus drawing attention to their collective fate and individual humanity. This is a well-written, powerful, and deeply unsettling work. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. Most levels/libraries. G. F. Schroeder St. John's University, Minnesota

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