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When Sherman marched north from the sea : resistance on the Confederate home front / Jacqueline Glass Campbell.

By: Campbell, Jacqueline Glass.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Civil War America: Publisher: Chapel Hill, N.C. : London : University of North Carolina Press ; Eurospan [distributor], 2005Description: 192 p. : map.ISBN: 0807856592 (pbk.); 9780807856598 (pbk.).Subject(s): Passive resistance -- Confederate States of America | Sherman's March to the Sea | Confederate States of America -- Social conditionsDDC classification: 973.7378
Contents:
Savannah has gone up the spout -- Rocking the cradle of secession -- When the wind blows -- When the bough breaks -- The most diabolical act of all the barbarous war -- God save us from the retreating friend and advancing foe -- With grief, but not with shame.
Review: "Home front and battle front merged in 1865 when General William T. Sherman occupied Savannah and then marched his armies north through the Carolinas. When Union soldiers brought war into Southern households, Northern soldiers were frequently astounded by the fierceness with which many white Southern women defended their homes. Campbell convincingly restores these women to their role as vital players in the fight for a Confederate nation, as models of self-assertion rather than passive self-sacrifice." "Campbell also investigates the complexities behind African Americans' decisions either to stay on the plantation or to flee with Union troops. Black Southerners' delight at the coming of the army of "emancipation" often turned to terror as Yankees plundered their homes and assaulted black women."--BOOK JACKET.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E476.69 .C36 2005 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001833771

Originally published: 2003.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Ch. 1. Savannah has gone up the spout -- Ch. 2. Rocking the cradle of secession -- When the wind blows -- When the bough breaks -- Ch. 3. The most diabolical act of all the barbarous war -- Ch. 4. God save us from the retreating friend and advancing foe -- Ch. 5. With grief, but not with shame.

"Home front and battle front merged in 1865 when General William T. Sherman occupied Savannah and then marched his armies north through the Carolinas. When Union soldiers brought war into Southern households, Northern soldiers were frequently astounded by the fierceness with which many white Southern women defended their homes. Campbell convincingly restores these women to their role as vital players in the fight for a Confederate nation, as models of self-assertion rather than passive self-sacrifice." "Campbell also investigates the complexities behind African Americans' decisions either to stay on the plantation or to flee with Union troops. Black Southerners' delight at the coming of the army of "emancipation" often turned to terror as Yankees plundered their homes and assaulted black women."--BOOK JACKET.

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Library Journal Review

Images of Southern women's untiring devotion to the Confederate cause emerged between 1861 and 1865 and were perpetuated in the postwar period but have been questioned by scholars such as George Rable and Drew Gilpin Faust in recent decades. In this blend of military and women's history, Campbell (history, Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs) examines the interactions of white and black Southern men and women on the home front with the Union troops who waged the destructive march through Georgia and the Carolinas in the last months of the war. Campbell concludes that Southern women boldly defended their homes against the invaders, an experience that galvanized their dedication to the Confederacy and set the stage for institutionalized devotion to the Lost Cause, immense respect for Lee, and hatred for Sherman. This concise and readable study, based upon extensive manuscript sources, is recommended for larger academic libraries.-Theresa R. McDevitt, Indiana Univ. of Pennsylvania (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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