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The conquest of Texas : ethnic cleansing in the promised land, 1820-1875 / Gary Clayton Anderson.

By: Anderson, Gary Clayton, 1948-.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Norman : University of Oklahoma Press, c2005Description: x, 494 p. : ill., maps ; 26 cm.ISBN: 0806136987 (alk. paper); 9780806136981 (alk. paper).Subject(s): Texas -- Race relations -- History -- 19th century | Racism -- Texas -- History -- 19th century | Violence -- Texas -- History -- 19th century | Forced migration -- Texas -- History -- 19th century | Mexicans -- Texas -- Social conditions -- 19th century | Indians of North America -- Texas -- Social conditions -- 19th century | Texas Rangers -- History -- 19th century | Texas -- History, Military -- 19th century | Texas -- History -- To 1846 | Texas -- History -- 1846-1950DDC classification: 305.8/009764/09034 Other classification: 15.85
Contents:
1. At the dawn of the American invasion -- 2. The Texas creed in a Tejano and Indian land -- 3. Mexican politics and the struggle to settle early Texas -- 4. The muddle of early Mexican federalism -- 5. Centralists and the struggle for Texas land -- 6. The Americanization of Texas -- 7. The Texas creed and the clouds of war -- 8. Revolution and the "rumor" of Indian war -- 9. Indian intransigence -- 10. Sam Houston, the legislature, and a failed Indian policy -- 11. Lamar, his generals, and ethnic cleansing -- 12. The Indians' last stand in central Texas -- 13. The failure of well-intended efforts -- 14. The boundary line fiasco -- 15. Lines, politics, depredations, and the U.S. Army -- 16. General Persifor Smith and the salvation of Texas -- 17. Reservations or concentration camps? -- 18. The plan -- 19. Anarchy and "total war" -- 20. The final exodus -- 21. Indians and the civil war -- 22. The final ethnic cleansing of Texas
Summary: "At the very heart of Texas mythology are the Texas Rangers. Until now most histories have justified their actions and vilified their opponents. But Anderson tells how the Texas government encouraged the rangers to annihilate Indian villages, including women and children, spreading terror so that the survivors and neighboring Native groups would want to leave. The policy succeeded: by the 1870s, Indians had been driven from central and western Texas. Anderson offers a new paradigm for understanding the violence dominating Texas history. By confronting head-on the romanticized version of Texas history that made heroes of Houston, Lamar, and Baylor, this account helps us understand that the history of the Lone Star state is darker and more complex than the mythmakers allowed."--Book jacket.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
F395.A1 A53 2005 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001834472

Includes bibliographical references (p. [459]-476) and index.

1. At the dawn of the American invasion -- 2. The Texas creed in a Tejano and Indian land -- 3. Mexican politics and the struggle to settle early Texas -- 4. The muddle of early Mexican federalism -- 5. Centralists and the struggle for Texas land -- 6. The Americanization of Texas -- 7. The Texas creed and the clouds of war -- 8. Revolution and the "rumor" of Indian war -- 9. Indian intransigence -- 10. Sam Houston, the legislature, and a failed Indian policy -- 11. Lamar, his generals, and ethnic cleansing -- 12. The Indians' last stand in central Texas -- 13. The failure of well-intended efforts -- 14. The boundary line fiasco -- 15. Lines, politics, depredations, and the U.S. Army -- 16. General Persifor Smith and the salvation of Texas -- 17. Reservations or concentration camps? -- 18. The plan -- 19. Anarchy and "total war" -- 20. The final exodus -- 21. Indians and the civil war -- 22. The final ethnic cleansing of Texas

"At the very heart of Texas mythology are the Texas Rangers. Until now most histories have justified their actions and vilified their opponents. But Anderson tells how the Texas government encouraged the rangers to annihilate Indian villages, including women and children, spreading terror so that the survivors and neighboring Native groups would want to leave. The policy succeeded: by the 1870s, Indians had been driven from central and western Texas. Anderson offers a new paradigm for understanding the violence dominating Texas history. By confronting head-on the romanticized version of Texas history that made heroes of Houston, Lamar, and Baylor, this account helps us understand that the history of the Lone Star state is darker and more complex than the mythmakers allowed."--Book jacket.

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