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A thousand barrels a second : the coming oil break point and the challenges facing an energy dependent world / Peter Tertzakian.

By: Tertzakian, Peter.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : McGraw-Hill, c2006Description: xv, 272 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.ISBN: 0071468749 (alk. paper); 9780071468749 (alk. paper).Subject(s): Power resources | Petroleum industry and trade | Energy consumption -- ForecastingAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Thousand barrels a second.DDC classification: 338.2/7282 LOC classification: HD9502.A2 | T473 2006Other classification: QR 534
Contents:
Introduction: The coming oil break point -- Lighting the last whale lamp -- The thirty-three percent advantage -- Not a wheel turns -- To the ends of the earth -- The technology ticket -- The next great rebalancing act -- A golden age of energy opportunity.
Summary: In 2006, world oil consumption will exceed one thousand barrels per second. The news marks an important change that will have a far-reaching impact on world economies, investments, and business profitability. In A Thousand Barrels a Second, Chief Energy Economist of ARC Financial Peter Tertzakian examines the future of oil and offers insights into what it will take to rebalance our energy needs and seize new opportunities. He answers the top questions asked by business leaders, policy makers, investors, and concerned citizens as we approach the coming break point: Are today's high oil and gas prices part of a routine business cycle, or are there more profound forces at play? Are hybrid vehicles our only solution against high gasoline prices? Is China's growing thirst for energy sustainable? Which government policies work and which do not? Will nuclear power and coal save the day-again? Tertzakian also offers a realistic, informed look into the future of our energy supply chains and how our consumption patterns may evolve, revealing how governments, businesses, and even individuals can meet the coming challenges with better solutions and innovations.
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Book University of Texas At Tyler
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HD9502 .A2 T473 2006 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001838564

Includes bibliographical references (p. 257-260) and index.

Introduction: The coming oil break point -- Lighting the last whale lamp -- The thirty-three percent advantage -- Not a wheel turns -- To the ends of the earth -- The technology ticket -- The next great rebalancing act -- A golden age of energy opportunity.

In 2006, world oil consumption will exceed one thousand barrels per second. The news marks an important change that will have a far-reaching impact on world economies, investments, and business profitability. In A Thousand Barrels a Second, Chief Energy Economist of ARC Financial Peter Tertzakian examines the future of oil and offers insights into what it will take to rebalance our energy needs and seize new opportunities. He answers the top questions asked by business leaders, policy makers, investors, and concerned citizens as we approach the coming break point: Are today's high oil and gas prices part of a routine business cycle, or are there more profound forces at play? Are hybrid vehicles our only solution against high gasoline prices? Is China's growing thirst for energy sustainable? Which government policies work and which do not? Will nuclear power and coal save the day-again? Tertzakian also offers a realistic, informed look into the future of our energy supply chains and how our consumption patterns may evolve, revealing how governments, businesses, and even individuals can meet the coming challenges with better solutions and innovations.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Economist Tertzakian (director, ARC Financial Corp.) paints a grim picture of the current state of energy in the world, providing ample historical context and raising important questions about energy use in the past, present, and future. The author refreshingly reminds us that there is still plenty of oil in the ground, but it's getting harder to access. His discussion of energy supply chains is illuminating as he makes the case that a "break point" in the system is inevitable and could cause an energy crisis. While much of what Tertzakian states is not new (e.g., the need to conserve energy resources and embrace new energy solutions), he reminds us how technology using hydrogen and other "renewable" resources might help fill the resource gap. He also points out that although the United States has long been the number one energy-using country, China may soon overtake us, with geopolitical implications; Russia may prove a more powerful energy supplier than any of the Middle Eastern countries in the future. Being an economist, Tertzakian provides a great deal of data, which may overwhelm the reader, but there is no mistaking his point that "our birthright of abundant, reliable energy is coming to an end" and that our energy options are rapidly dwindling. Highly recommended for all public libraries and business collections.-Richard Drezen, Washington Post, New York City Bureau (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

Shifts in the world's energy sector are the focus of this interesting account by an economist versed in corporate and financial operations. Tertzakian predicts the US is headed toward an oil "break point" by 2010. This occurs when a fuel becomes "disadvantaged" due to high price, utility, security of sources, or military liability, and can lead to an imbalance between supply and demand. He maintains that "cheap, clean, easy-to-obtain energy" will no longer be available, but that the US will "adapt" and "rebalance" just as it managed to do during the early 1980s. Tertzakian believes in the resilience of the "energy cycle," and maintains that rebalancing has already started proactively through the mechanism of rising oil prices. He envisions a shift toward greater usage of coal, natural gas, and nuclear power--but not much progress on hydrogen-based fuels. At the same time, the author predicts high oil prices in the immediate future, which will encourage domestic exploration for oil. Tertzakian's presentation is easy to read and factually accurate, but there is one major error in attributing the 1971-74 embargo to OPEC instead of to Arab oil exporters. Overall, this volume is a thoughtful, well-argued study of a major policy issue facing the US. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All collections. A. Klinghoffer Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Camden

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p> Peter Tertzakian is ChiefEnergy Economist of ARCFinancial Corporation, one ofthe world's leading privateequity firms focused onenergy. His background ingeophysics, economics,and finance, combined withhis entrepreneurial spirit,helped him rise from the trenches of hands-on oilexploration fieldwork to become an internationallyrecognized, top-ranked analyst with corporate andinstitutional following in boardrooms internationally.Tertzakian publishes ARC Energy Charts, a weeklysynopsis of world energy trends.For more information visitwww.athousandbarrelsasecond.com</p>

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