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George Washington : the Founding Father / Paul Johnson.

By: Johnson, Paul, 1928-.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Eminent lives: Publisher: New York : Atlas Books/HarperCollins, c2005Edition: 1st ed.Description: 126 p. ; 19 cm.ISBN: 006075365X (acid-free paper); 9780060753658 (acid-free paper).Subject(s): Washington, George, 1732-1799 | Presidents -- United States -- Biography | Generals -- United States -- Biography | United States. Continental Army -- Biography | United States -- History -- Revolution, 1775-1783 | United States -- Politics and government -- 1789-1797DDC classification: 973.4/1/092 | B
Contents:
Young gentleman's youth in Virginia -- Gallant young colonel and his rich wife -- Slaveowner, agricultural pioneer, builder -- Commander in chief and victor -- Creating a nation: Theory -- Creating a nation: Practice -- Last years.
Summary: Washington is the most important figure in the history of the United States. Against all military odds, he liberated the colonies from the superior forces of the British and presided over the process to produce a Constitution. In two terms as president, he set that Constitution to work. Despite his importance, Washington remains today a distant figure to many Americans. Previous books about him are immensely long and complicated. Paul Johnson has now produced a brief life that presents a vivid portrait of the great man as young warrior, masterly commander-in-chief, patient Constitution maker, and exceptionally wise president. He also shows Washington as a farmer of unusual skill and an entrepreneur of foresight, patriarch of an extended family, and proprietor of one of the most beautiful homes in America, which he largely built and adorned.--From publisher description.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E312 .J67 2005 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001842400
Browsing University of Texas At Tyler Shelves , Shelving location: Stacks - 3rd Floor Close shelf browser
E312 .H92 V.3 3 George Washington ... E312 .I734 1976 George Washington : E312 .I77 1975 Life of George Washington / E312 .J67 2005 George Washington : E312 .L78 George Washington E312 .M12 Greatest of men, Washington ... E313 .A45 1973 The Genet mission /

Includes bibliographical references (p. 125-126).

Young gentleman's youth in Virginia -- Gallant young colonel and his rich wife -- Slaveowner, agricultural pioneer, builder -- Commander in chief and victor -- Creating a nation: Theory -- Creating a nation: Practice -- Last years.

Washington is the most important figure in the history of the United States. Against all military odds, he liberated the colonies from the superior forces of the British and presided over the process to produce a Constitution. In two terms as president, he set that Constitution to work. Despite his importance, Washington remains today a distant figure to many Americans. Previous books about him are immensely long and complicated. Paul Johnson has now produced a brief life that presents a vivid portrait of the great man as young warrior, masterly commander-in-chief, patient Constitution maker, and exceptionally wise president. He also shows Washington as a farmer of unusual skill and an entrepreneur of foresight, patriarch of an extended family, and proprietor of one of the most beautiful homes in America, which he largely built and adorned.--From publisher description.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

School Library Journal Review

Adult/High School-This biography, written from the vantage point of a respected, conservative British historian, provides a new and fascinating picture of the first U.S. President. Johnson doesn't have Americans' natural inclination to deify Washington, but he does have a great deal of respect for his subject, delineating the man's merits and deficiencies. The author also brings the situation in Britain at the time-the backdrop against which Washington reached the heights of his fame-into perspective. These well-written and well-thought-out interpretations will benefit anyone interested in the man or his times.-Ted Westervelt, Library of Congress, Washington, DC (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

These volumes represent the latest additions to the publisher's "Eminent Lives" series--brief biographies of canonical figures written by distinguished authors. The publisher claims that "pairing great subjects with writers known for their strong sensibilities and sharp, lively points of view" makes these books "ideal introductions designed to appeal to the general reader, the student, and the scholar." Volumes already published and those forthcoming span Muhammed and Machiavelli to Alexis de Tocqueville and Ulysses S. Grant. In George Washington, Johnson admits that the general's life is well documented, but his book does not reveal the remoteness and mystery that the author acknowledges. Falling into the old progressive trap of idol worship, Johnson celebrates the young surveyor and warrior, praises the masterly commander-in-chief, and reveres the patient Constitution maker and wise first president. Washington undoubtedly represented one of the greatest Americans of the founding era, but he also had faults, made hasty and poor judgments, and often found himself consumed by passion. That Washington--the human side of the hero who struggled with his shortcomings--unfortunately does not appear in this volume. Hitchens's Thomas Jefferson attempts to situate the controversial founding father within the context of changing world and American events. Unlike any other early American except Washington, Jefferson became clearly defined by the events of his lifetime. He authored the Declaration during turbulent revolution, purchased the Louisiana Territory during international conflict, and founded the University of Virginia when Americans grappled to define the ideas of their nation and states. Hitchens's tendency to simplify or often misread Jefferson does not do justice to such a complex figure. Perhaps presenting more information about the era in which Jefferson lived would have helped flesh out the complexities of this formative figure. ^BSumming Up: Recommended, both books. Public and general collections. G. A. Smith Texas Christian University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Paul Johnson lives in London. <p>

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