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I am a man! : race, manhood, and the civil rights movement / Steve Estes.

By: Estes, Steve, 1972-.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, c2005Description: x, 239 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.ISBN: 0807829293 (cloth : alk. paper); 9780807829295 (cloth : alk. paper); 0807855936 (pbk. : alk. paper); 9780807855935 (pbk. : alk. paper).Subject(s): African Americans -- Civil rights -- History -- 20th century | Civil rights movements -- United States -- History -- 20th century | African American civil rights workers -- Attitudes -- History -- 20th century | African American men -- Attitudes -- History -- 20th century | Rhetoric -- Political aspects -- United States -- History -- 20th century | Masculinity -- Political aspects -- United States -- History -- 20th century | Sex role -- Political aspects -- United States -- History -- 20th century | Sexism -- United States -- History -- 20th century | Racism -- United States -- History -- 20th century | United States -- Race relationsAdditional physical formats: Online version:: I am a man!; Online version:: I am a man!DDC classification: 323.1196/073 Other classification: 15.85 | MG 70968
Contents:
Introduction : am I not a man and a brother? -- Man the guns -- A question of honor -- Freedom summer and the Mississippi movement -- God's angry men -- The Moynihan report -- I am a man! : the Memphis sanitation strike -- "The baddest motherfuckers ever to set foot inside of history" -- Conclusion : "the heartz of men."
Summary: The civil rights movement was first and foremost a struggle for racial equality, but questions of gender lay deeply embedded within this struggle. Steve Estes explores key groups, leaders, and events in the movement to understand how activists used race and manhood to articulate their visions of what American society should be. Estes demonstrates that, at crucial turning points in the movement, both segregationists and civil rights activists harnessed masculinist rhetoric, tapping into implicit assumptions about race, gender, and sexuality. Estes begins with an analysis of the role of black men in World War II and then examines the segregationists, who demonized black male sexuality and galvanized white men behind the ideal of southern honor. Later, he explores the militant new models of manhood espoused by civil rights activists and groups such as Malcolm X, the Nation of Islam, the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, Martin Luther King Jr., and the Black Panther Party. Reliance on masculinist organizing strategies had both positive and negative consequences, Estes concludes. Tracing these strategies from the integration of the U.S. military in the 1940s through the Million Man March in the 1990s, he shows that masculinism rallied men to action but left unchallenged many of the patriarchal assumptions that underlay American society. --Publisher.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E185.61 .E76 2005 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001842053

Includes bibliographical references (p. [217]-233) and index.

Introduction : am I not a man and a brother? -- Man the guns -- A question of honor -- Freedom summer and the Mississippi movement -- God's angry men -- The Moynihan report -- I am a man! : the Memphis sanitation strike -- "The baddest motherfuckers ever to set foot inside of history" -- Conclusion : "the heartz of men."

The civil rights movement was first and foremost a struggle for racial equality, but questions of gender lay deeply embedded within this struggle. Steve Estes explores key groups, leaders, and events in the movement to understand how activists used race and manhood to articulate their visions of what American society should be. Estes demonstrates that, at crucial turning points in the movement, both segregationists and civil rights activists harnessed masculinist rhetoric, tapping into implicit assumptions about race, gender, and sexuality. Estes begins with an analysis of the role of black men in World War II and then examines the segregationists, who demonized black male sexuality and galvanized white men behind the ideal of southern honor. Later, he explores the militant new models of manhood espoused by civil rights activists and groups such as Malcolm X, the Nation of Islam, the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, Martin Luther King Jr., and the Black Panther Party. Reliance on masculinist organizing strategies had both positive and negative consequences, Estes concludes. Tracing these strategies from the integration of the U.S. military in the 1940s through the Million Man March in the 1990s, he shows that masculinism rallied men to action but left unchallenged many of the patriarchal assumptions that underlay American society. --Publisher.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Estes (Sonoma State Univ.) has produced an important and lively contribution to the literature on gender and the Civil Rights Movement. Each chapter can serve as a discrete essay, but taken as a whole, the book fluidly covers some of the vital periods and themes in the struggle for black equality by examining them through the lens of manhood and the movement. Treating such topics as the role of African American soldiers in WW II, the Mississippi movement, the Nation of Islam, the Moynihan report, the Memphis Sanitation Workers Strike of 1968, and black power, Estes reveals how ideas of masculinity fueled activists yet at the same time limited them, particularly with regard to women, but also when it came to gay activists. Refreshingly free of jargon and the superfluous theoretical apparatus that often characterize such works, Estes takes a fresh approach to his topic that any civil rights historian will welcome. Weighing in at only 187 pages of text, his book will work perfectly in undergraduate classes, and his approach will be a welcome addition to graduate seminars. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. All levels/libraries. D. C. Catsam University of Texas of the Permian Basin

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