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Women's roles in the Renaissance / Meg Lota Brown and Kari Boyd McBride.

By: Brown, Meg Lota.
Contributor(s): McBride, Kari Boyd.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Women's roles through history: Publisher: Westport, Conn. : Greenwood Press, 2005Description: xxxviii, 335 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.ISBN: 0313322104 (alk. paper); 9780313322105 (alk. paper).Subject(s): Women -- History -- Renaissance, 1450-1600 | Sex role -- Europe -- History | Social role -- Europe -- History | Social change -- Europe -- History | Europe -- Social conditionsAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Women's roles in the Renaissance.DDC classification: 305.4/094/0903 Other classification: 15.70 | NW 8100
Contents:
Introduction : women and the Renaissance -- Women and education -- Women and the law -- Women and work -- Women and politics -- Women and religion -- Women and literature -- Women and the arts -- Women and pleasures.
Summary: The story of the Renaissance has usually been told through the elite male perspective. Here, the lives of women and girls from a wide range of classes, religions, and countries in Europe take center stage. Women had a significant impact on the economy, social structures, and the culture of the Renaissance, despite the constraints on their exercise of power, lack of opportunities, and enforced dependence. This book examines the attitudes and practices that shaped the varied roles of women then, but also the important ways women shaped the world in which they lived. The focus is on both the ideas that circulated about women and on the difference between representations of them and their everyday life experiences. The narrative draws from a wide variety of sources on every aspect of women's lives: education, the law, work, politics, religion, literature, the arts, and pleasures. Numerous women are profiled, and many period illustrations are included.--From publisher description.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
HQ1149 .E85 B76 2005 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001842178

Includes bibliographical references (p. [303]-320) and index.

Introduction : women and the Renaissance -- Women and education -- Women and the law -- Women and work -- Women and politics -- Women and religion -- Women and literature -- Women and the arts -- Women and pleasures.

The story of the Renaissance has usually been told through the elite male perspective. Here, the lives of women and girls from a wide range of classes, religions, and countries in Europe take center stage. Women had a significant impact on the economy, social structures, and the culture of the Renaissance, despite the constraints on their exercise of power, lack of opportunities, and enforced dependence. This book examines the attitudes and practices that shaped the varied roles of women then, but also the important ways women shaped the world in which they lived. The focus is on both the ideas that circulated about women and on the difference between representations of them and their everyday life experiences. The narrative draws from a wide variety of sources on every aspect of women's lives: education, the law, work, politics, religion, literature, the arts, and pleasures. Numerous women are profiled, and many period illustrations are included.--From publisher description.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Continuing the publisher's tradition of providing series (e.g., biographical dictionaries, "Daily Life" in various historical periods) for libraries and undergraduates, this book examines the many ways that women shaped and were shaped by the period from 1300 to 1699. Brown and McBride (both English, Univ. of Arizona, Tucson) summarize the major ideas held about women in the premodern era and explore the intersection of those ideas with women's everyday lives. Eight narrative chapters synthesize recent and traditional scholarship in early modern European history, covering women and education, law, work, politics, religion, literature, the arts, and, unexpectedly, pleasures. The introduction offers a fine overview of the Renaissance/early modern era, preceded by a comprehensive 20-page time line. Sensitive to the impact of class, religion, geography, and race upon women (and men), the authors strive to be inclusive in their use of sources and examples, although the images chosen, while useful, betray one author's specialization in British history. Happily, the text gives equal coverage to most major west European countries and the ways in which women's experiences were similar and different. The book echoes the pioneering work of Merry Wiesner, Natalie Zemon Davis, and other feminist historians. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. General and undergraduate collections. C. Carlsmith University of Massachusetts--Lowell

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p> Meg Lota Brown is Professor of English at the University of Arizona, Tucson.</p> <p> Kari Boyd McBride is Associate Professor and Undergraduate Director in the Women's Studies Department, Faculty Affiliate in the Department of English, and Director of the Group for Early Modern Studies at the University of Arizona, Tucson.</p>

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