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The autobiography of Medgar Evers : a hero's life and legacy revealed through his writings, letters, and speeches / edited and with commentaries by Myrlie Evers-Willams and Manning Marable.

By: Evers, Medgar Wiley, 1925-1963.
Contributor(s): Evers-Williams, Myrlie | Marable, Manning, 1950-2011.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Basic Civitas Books, c2005Description: xxiv, 352 p., [16] p. of plates : ill. ; 25 cm.ISBN: 9780465021772; 0465021778; 0465021786; 9780465021789.Subject(s): Evers, Medgar Wiley, 1925-1963 | African American civil rights workers -- Mississippi -- Jackson -- Biography | Civil rights workers -- Mississippi -- Jackson -- Biography | National Association for the Advancement of Colored People -- Biography | Civil rights movements -- Mississippi -- History -- 20th century | African Americans -- Civil rights -- Mississippi -- History -- 20th century | Mississippi -- Race relations | Jackson (Miss.) -- BiographyDDC classification: 323.092 | B LOC classification: F349.J13 | E93 2005Other classification: 15.85
Contents:
Bring justice sure -- Trial by fire -- Why I live in Mississippi -- Our need for political participation -- Keep your eyes on the prize -- Taking freedom for ourselves -- I speak as a native Mississippian -- After Medgar, no more fear.
Summary: The American civil rights movement of the 1950s, and 1960s was spurred by innumerable heros who earned small triumphs in the face of epic intolerance and terror. [This book] reveals what it mean to fight the most intractably racist bureaucracy of the Tim Crow era. [In the book, the editor] ha[s] created a vibrant portrait of an activist at work. The result is both a tribute to a civil rights hero and a living testament to the power of grassroots political action to change our lives for the better.-Dust jacket.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
F349.J13 A3 2005 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002146165
Browsing University of Texas At Tyler Shelves , Shelving location: Stacks - 3rd Floor Close shelf browser
F229 .K9 1984 Roanoke, the abandoned colony / F262.P25 M946 2011 Executing Daniel Bright : F296 .D38 2018 The Gulf : F349.J13 A3 2005 The autobiography of Medgar Evers : F349.V6 C58 2016 Occupied Vicksburg / F351 .M59 2004 The Midwest / F372 .B4 1989 French and Spanish records of Louisiana :

Includes bibliographical references (p. 327-330) and index.

Bring justice sure -- Trial by fire -- Why I live in Mississippi -- Our need for political participation -- Keep your eyes on the prize -- Taking freedom for ourselves -- I speak as a native Mississippian -- After Medgar, no more fear.

The American civil rights movement of the 1950s, and 1960s was spurred by innumerable heros who earned small triumphs in the face of epic intolerance and terror. [This book] reveals what it mean to fight the most intractably racist bureaucracy of the Tim Crow era. [In the book, the editor] ha[s] created a vibrant portrait of an activist at work. The result is both a tribute to a civil rights hero and a living testament to the power of grassroots political action to change our lives for the better.-Dust jacket.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

June 2005 marks the 42nd anniversary of the assassination of Evers, the civil rights leader and first Mississippi field secretary of the NAACP. His autobiography has been put together for the first time by his widow, Evers-Williams, and Marable (history, Columbia Univ.; W.E.B. DuBois: Black Radical Democrat) from Evers's unpublished papers and personal collections as well as Evers-Williams's recollections. The resulting text resurrects the life, intellectual output, and creative legacy of the slain civil rights hero. Evers became a marked man throughout Mississippi as a result of his tireless civil rights efforts, which included making it possible for blacks to vote, having the first black, James Meredith, admitted to the University of Mississippi, and bringing national attention to the lynchings of Emmett Till and Mack Charles Parker. In the early 1960s "inside the Evers home, furniture was piled in front of all the windows, and the barricaded nature was not uncommon for a civil rights person in Mississippi." On June 12, 1963, at age 37, Evers was gunned down in the driveway of his home in Jackson. His was the first political assassination of a prominent leader of the modern Black Freedom Movement. This autobiography is deftly organized into eight chapters, the final two being "I Speak as a Native Mississippian" and "After Medgar, No More Fear." These chapters enunciate his greatest achievements: his relentless struggle and determination to stay in Jackson against all odds and his bequest to fear no more. An excellent resource on the Civil Rights Movement for both academic and public libraries.-Edward McCormack, Cox Lib. Media Ctr. & Curriculum Lab, Univ. of Southern Mississippi Gulf Coast, Long Beach (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

Strictly speaking, this is not an autobiography, but it is autobiographical. This is evident in the speeches and other documents in the book, which give readers a strong sense of the man who did so much for freedom in Mississippi. Some documents are reports to the national office of the NAACP, in which Evers reflects the policies of the organization, but other papers reveal his frustrations with its legalistic approach. His wife, Myrlie, contributes her strong feelings about her husband's beliefs. Especially noteworthy is her touching account of the couple's awareness that his death was always possible, and in June of 1963, very probable. Historian Marable (Columbia Univ.) contributes introductions to each chronological section of the book and provides historical facts and interpretations of the Civil Rights Movement in Mississippi, the nation, and the world. Undoubtedly, other studies of Medgar Evers and the Civil Rights Movement in Mississippi will follow that will add to our knowledge and understanding of him and his generation. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. General and undergraduate collections. L. H. Grothaus emeritus, Concordia University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Manning Marable was born in Dayton, Ohio on May 13, 1950. In 1968, he served as the local black newspaper's correspondent and marched along with thousands of others during the funeral procession for Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. He received a bachelor's degree from Earlham College in Indiana, a master's degree from the University of Wisconsin and a doctorate from the University of Maryland. He wrote around 20 books during his lifetime including How Capitalism Underdeveloped Black America, The Great Wells of Democracy: The Meaning of Race in American Life, Speaking Truth to Power: Essays on Race, Resistance and Radicalism, and Malcolm X: A Life of Reinvention. He was a professor of African American studies, history, political science and public affairs at Columbia University. He died from complications of pneumonia on April 1, 2011 at the age of 60. <p> (Bowker Author Biography)

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