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Community organizing and youth advocacy / Sarah Deschenes, Milbrey McLaughlin, Anne Newman, issue editors.

Contributor(s): Deschenes, Sarah | McLaughlin, Milbrey Wallin | Newman, Anne.
Material type: TextTextSeries: New directions for youth development: no. 117.Publisher: San Francisco : Jossey-Bass/Wiley, 2008Description: 129 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.ISBN: 0470343613; 9780470343616.Subject(s): Youth in development | Youth development | Community organization | Community and school | Educational change -- United States | Parental influencesAlso issued online.
Contents:
Organizations advocating for youth : the local advantage / Sarah Deschenes, Milbrey McLaughlin, Anne Newman -- Youth organizing : from youth development to school reform / Mark R. Warren, Meredith Mira, Thomas Nikundiwe -- Negotiating reform : young people's leadership in the educational arena / Seema Shah, Kavitha Mediratta -- Thirty years of advocacy in San Francisco : lessons learned and the next generation of leadership / N'Tanya Lee -- The development of collective moral leadership among parents through education organizing / Michael P. Evans, Dennis Shirley -- Faith-based organizing for youth : one organization's district campaign for small schools policy / Ron Snyder -- Developing the field of youth organizing and advocacy : what foundations can do / Sylvia M. Yee.
Abstract: This issue presents new thinking about the ways in which youth and parents are engaged in local reform, particularly education reform, with the help of community organizations. Community groups examined in this volume advocate for and with youth in a variety of ways: through youth organizing, parent organizing, more traditional youth advocacy, and funding support. These organizations are critical in promoting youth's healthy development. They lobby to change policy and service delivery, connect diverse institutions that serve youth, push for more resources for youth, educate local officials about youth's needs, and empower parents and youth to become advocates in their own right. There is a ripple effect in these local efforts; not only do policies and political contexts change, but individual and communities themselves begin to change too. And although there are significant barriers to changing entrenched ideas about youth and their needs, the efforts discussed in these articles are having tangible results in many urban areas.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
HV1431 .C655 2008 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001878032

"Spring 2008"

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Organizations advocating for youth : the local advantage / Sarah Deschenes, Milbrey McLaughlin, Anne Newman -- Youth organizing : from youth development to school reform / Mark R. Warren, Meredith Mira, Thomas Nikundiwe -- Negotiating reform : young people's leadership in the educational arena / Seema Shah, Kavitha Mediratta -- Thirty years of advocacy in San Francisco : lessons learned and the next generation of leadership / N'Tanya Lee -- The development of collective moral leadership among parents through education organizing / Michael P. Evans, Dennis Shirley -- Faith-based organizing for youth : one organization's district campaign for small schools policy / Ron Snyder -- Developing the field of youth organizing and advocacy : what foundations can do / Sylvia M. Yee.

Also issued online.

This issue presents new thinking about the ways in which youth and parents are engaged in local reform, particularly education reform, with the help of community organizations. Community groups examined in this volume advocate for and with youth in a variety of ways: through youth organizing, parent organizing, more traditional youth advocacy, and funding support. These organizations are critical in promoting youth's healthy development. They lobby to change policy and service delivery, connect diverse institutions that serve youth, push for more resources for youth, educate local officials about youth's needs, and empower parents and youth to become advocates in their own right. There is a ripple effect in these local efforts; not only do policies and political contexts change, but individual and communities themselves begin to change too. And although there are significant barriers to changing entrenched ideas about youth and their needs, the efforts discussed in these articles are having tangible results in many urban areas.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>Sarah Deschenes is a consultant who has been conducting research on education policy, community development, and out-of-school time for over a decade. She was also a postdoctoral fellow at the John W. Gardner Center for Youth and Their Communities at Stanford University.</p> <p>Milbrey McLaughlin is the David Jacks Professor of Education and Public Policy at Stanford University, the founding director of the John W. Gardner Center for Youth and Their Communities, and the codirector of the Center for Research on the Context of Teaching.</p> <p>Anne Newman is an assistant professor of education at Washington University in St. Louis, where her work focuses on educational philosophy and policy.</p>

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