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What hath God wrought : the transformation of America, 1815-1848 / Daniel Walker Howe.

By: Howe, Daniel Walker.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Oxford history of the United States (Unnumbered): Publisher: New York : Oxford University Press, 2007Description: xviii, 904 p., [16] p. of plates : ill., maps ; 25 cm.ISBN: 9780195078947 (hardcover : alk. paper); 0195078942 (hardcover : alk. paper).Subject(s): United States -- History -- 1815-1861 | United States -- Foreign relations -- 1815-1861 | United States -- Politics and government -- 1815-1861 | United States -- Economic conditions -- To 1865 | Social change -- United States -- History -- 19th centuryLOC classification: E338 | .H69 2007
Contents:
Prologue: The defeat of the past -- The continental setting -- From the jaws of defeat -- An era of good and bad feelings -- The world that cotton made -- Awakenings of religion -- Overthrowing the tyranny of distance -- The improvers -- Pursuing the millennium -- Andrew Jackson and his age -- Battles over sovereignty -- Jacksonian democracy and the rule of law -- Reason and revelation -- Jackson's third term -- The new economy -- The Whigs and their age -- American renaissance -- Texas, Tyler, and the telegraph -- Westward the star of empire -- The war against Mexico -- The revolutions of 1848 -- Finale: A vision of the future.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E338 .H69 2007 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001878818

Includes bibliographical references (p. [856]-878) and index.

Prologue: The defeat of the past -- The continental setting -- From the jaws of defeat -- An era of good and bad feelings -- The world that cotton made -- Awakenings of religion -- Overthrowing the tyranny of distance -- The improvers -- Pursuing the millennium -- Andrew Jackson and his age -- Battles over sovereignty -- Jacksonian democracy and the rule of law -- Reason and revelation -- Jackson's third term -- The new economy -- The Whigs and their age -- American renaissance -- Texas, Tyler, and the telegraph -- Westward the star of empire -- The war against Mexico -- The revolutions of 1848 -- Finale: A vision of the future.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

This authoritative addition to Oxford's "History of the United States" series is a product of synthesis and astute analysis. Intellectual and cultural historian Howe (Making the American Self: Jonathan Edwards to Abraham Lincoln) touches upon the rapidly expanding nation's economy, foreign relations, and social structures, taking into account race, gender, and ethnicity, and bringing special insights to his discussion of religious revivals and the evolution of moral consciousness, reform movements, and political institutions. The evocative title, which was the first message carried by Morse's telegraph, refers to the changes wrought by religious sensibilities as well as those wrought by technological breakthroughs. Howe boldly emphasizes the "communications revolution" rather than the "market revolution" of the early 19th century, asserting that the latter largely happened among 18th-century commercial farmers. On the other hand, he does not emphasize a "Jacksonian America." Andrew Jackson, he asserts, was not as uniformly democratic or influential as his supporters maintain. A worthy addition to public and academic institutions; beginning scholars will appreciate the maps and the extensive bibliographic essay, fleshed out by the journal citations in the footnotes. Highly recommended.-Frederick J. Augustyn Jr., Library of Congress (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

This masterful and sweeping synthesis of the early republic sets the standard for treatments of this period. Howe (emer., UCLA) argues that the twin revolutions of technology and communication were the fundamental elements shaping historical developments in this era, but he pays careful attention to the many facets of the period's history, including politics, economics, and the socio-cultural changes that so profoundly altered US society. The book's strengths are numerous, but Howe's signal contribution is to call into serious question the common characterization of Jacksonian democracy as a genuinely egalitarian impulse that greatly extended the scope of individual liberty during these years. Howe argues that this movement possessed a strong racial characteristic that wrote many groups out of the US polity as it expanded opportunities for white males. "The consequences of white male democracy, rather than its achievement, shaped the political life of this period." This much-needed corrective to the excessive lionization of the era's purported democratic character is vast in scope, yet eminently readable. Howe makes an admirable contribution to the historiography of the early republic even as he synthesizes much of that literature. Scholars, students, and general audiences with an interest in this crucial period will find this book a rewarding read. Summing Up: Essential. All collections. K. M. Gannon Grand View College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Daniel Walker Howe is Rhodes Professor of American History Emeritus, Oxford University and Professor of History Emeritus, University of California, Los Angeles. He is the author of The Political Culture of the American Whigs and Making the American Self: Jonathan Edwards to Abraham Lincoln. He lives in Los Angeles.

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