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The United States and right-wing dictatorships, 1965-1989 / David F. Schmitz.

By: Schmitz, David F.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2006Description: viii, 263 p. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 0521861330 (hardback); 9780521861335 (hardback); 0521678536 (pbk.); 9780521678537 (pbk.).Subject(s): United States -- Foreign relations -- 1945-1989 | Dictators -- History -- 20th century | Right-wing extremists -- History -- 20th century | Totalitarianism -- History -- 20th centuryDDC classification: 327.73/009/045
Contents:
No acceptable alternative : Mobutu in the Congo -- Degrading freedom : the Johnson administration and right-wing dictatorships -- Madmen : Richard Nixon, Henry Kissinger, and the quest for order -- Morality and diplomacy : the Church Committee and post-Vietnam foreign policy -- A fundamental tenet of foreign policy : Jimmy Carter and human rights -- What is the alternative? : the Reagan Doctrine and authoritarian regimes.
Review: "Building on David Schmitz's earlier work, Thank God They're on Our Side, this is an examination of American policy toward right-wing dictatorships from the 1960s to the end of the Cold War. During the 1920s, American leaders developed a policy of supporting authoritarian regimes because they were seen as stable, anticommunist, and capitalist. After 1965, however, American support for these regimes became a contested issue. The Vietnam War served to undercut the logic and rationale of supporting right-wing dictators.Summary: By systematically examining U.S. support for right-wing dictatorships in Africa, Latin America, Europe, and Asia and bringing together these disparate episodes, this book examines the persistence of older attitudes, the new debates brought about by the Vietnam War, and the efforts to bring about changes and an end to automatic U.S. support for authoritarian regimes."--BOOK JACKET.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E840 .S355 2006 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001881929

Includes bibliographical references (p. 247-257) and index.

No acceptable alternative : Mobutu in the Congo -- Degrading freedom : the Johnson administration and right-wing dictatorships -- Madmen : Richard Nixon, Henry Kissinger, and the quest for order -- Morality and diplomacy : the Church Committee and post-Vietnam foreign policy -- A fundamental tenet of foreign policy : Jimmy Carter and human rights -- What is the alternative? : the Reagan Doctrine and authoritarian regimes.

"Building on David Schmitz's earlier work, Thank God They're on Our Side, this is an examination of American policy toward right-wing dictatorships from the 1960s to the end of the Cold War. During the 1920s, American leaders developed a policy of supporting authoritarian regimes because they were seen as stable, anticommunist, and capitalist. After 1965, however, American support for these regimes became a contested issue. The Vietnam War served to undercut the logic and rationale of supporting right-wing dictators.

By systematically examining U.S. support for right-wing dictatorships in Africa, Latin America, Europe, and Asia and bringing together these disparate episodes, this book examines the persistence of older attitudes, the new debates brought about by the Vietnam War, and the efforts to bring about changes and an end to automatic U.S. support for authoritarian regimes."--BOOK JACKET.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

In this book, historian David Schmitz (Whitman College) examines the US policy of supporting authoritarian governments from the 1960s to the late 1980s. This sequel to the author's earlier study Thank God They're on Our Side: The United States and Right-Wing Dictatorships, 1921-1965 (1999) focuses on the foreign policies of the Johnson, Nixon, Carter, and Reagan administrations, all of which supported authoritarian regimes as a way of maintaining global order and preventing communism. In detailed case studies of American foreign policy toward the Congo, Chile, El Salvador, Greece, Indonesia, Iran, the Philippines, and South Africa, Schmitz shows that American leaders favored strong dictatorships, believing such governments were preferable to potentially more radical regimes. Although the US continued to affirm the priority of human rights and democratic systems, US foreign policy paradoxically supported dictatorships in the belief that they were "bulwarks against political instability and channels for modernization." This well-researched and carefully written book will be of interest to students of US foreign policy and scholars of American diplomatic history. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty. M. Amstutz Wheaton College

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