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The last thousand days of the British empire : Churchill, Roosevelt, and the birth of the Pax Americana / Peter Clarke.

By: Clarke, P. F.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Bloomsbury Press : Distributed to the trade by Macmillan, c2008Edition: 1st U.S. ed.Description: xxvii, 559 p., [16] p. of plates : ill., maps ; 25 cm.ISBN: 9781596915312 (alk. paper); 1596915315 (alk. paper).Subject(s): Great Britain -- Colonies -- History -- 20th century | Decolonization -- Colonies -- Great Britain -- History -- 20th century | Great Britain -- Foreign relations -- 1945-1964 | World War, 1939-1945 -- Great Britain | Churchill, Winston, 1874-1965 | Great Britain -- Foreign relations -- United States | Great Britain -- Politics and government -- 1945-1964 | United States -- Foreign relations -- Great Britain | United States -- Foreign relations -- 1945-1953 | Imperialism -- History -- 20th centuryDDC classification: 909/.09712410824
Contents:
1: Broad, sunlit uplands -- Prologue : 1941-4 -- 2: False summits -- The spirit of Quebec : September 1944 -- Setbacks : October-November 1944 -- Bad to worse : November-December 1944 -- Battles of the bulge : December 1944-January 1945 -- Awaiting the big three : January-February 1945 -- Yalta : February 1945 -- 3: Hollow victories -- Faltering and altering : February-March 1945 -- Shadows of death : March-April 1945 -- Justice? / May 1945 -- Peace, politics and Potsdam / June-July 1945 -- 4: The liquidation of the British Empire -- Hopes betrayed : August-October 1945 -- The costs of victory : October 1945-April 1946 -- Sabotage? : April-November 1946 -- Scuttle? : December 1946-August 1947.
Review: "Winston Churchill's declaration in W November 1942, just as the tide of the Second World War was beginning to turn, pugnaciously affirmed his loyalty to the worldwide institution that he had served for most of his life. Britain fought and sacrificed on a worldwide scale to defeat Hitler and his allies - and won. Yet less than five years after Churchill's defiant speech, the British Empire effectively ended with Indian independence in August 1947 and the end of the British mandate in Palestine in May 1948. As the sun set on Britain's empire, the age f America as world superpower dawned." "How did this rapid change of fortune come about? Peter Clarke's book is the first to explore the abrupt transition from Rule Britannia to Pax Americana. He shows how Roosevelt and his successors were determined that Britain must be sustained both during the war and after, but that the British Empire must not; and how the tension between Allied war aims, suppressed while the fighting was going on, became rapidly apparent when it ended. His swiftly paced narrative draws on letters, diaries, and a host of other primary sources to put us vividly in the presence of the figures around whom history pivoted: Churchill, Gandhi, Roosevelt, Stalin, Truman, and other, lesser-known individuals, through whom Clarke shows the human dimension of epochal events."--Jacket.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
DA16 .C56 2008 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001881820

Includes bibliographical references (p. 516-545) and index.

1: Broad, sunlit uplands -- Prologue : 1941-4 -- 2: False summits -- The spirit of Quebec : September 1944 -- Setbacks : October-November 1944 -- Bad to worse : November-December 1944 -- Battles of the bulge : December 1944-January 1945 -- Awaiting the big three : January-February 1945 -- Yalta : February 1945 -- 3: Hollow victories -- Faltering and altering : February-March 1945 -- Shadows of death : March-April 1945 -- Justice? / May 1945 -- Peace, politics and Potsdam / June-July 1945 -- 4: The liquidation of the British Empire -- Hopes betrayed : August-October 1945 -- The costs of victory : October 1945-April 1946 -- Sabotage? : April-November 1946 -- Scuttle? : December 1946-August 1947.

"Winston Churchill's declaration in W November 1942, just as the tide of the Second World War was beginning to turn, pugnaciously affirmed his loyalty to the worldwide institution that he had served for most of his life. Britain fought and sacrificed on a worldwide scale to defeat Hitler and his allies - and won. Yet less than five years after Churchill's defiant speech, the British Empire effectively ended with Indian independence in August 1947 and the end of the British mandate in Palestine in May 1948. As the sun set on Britain's empire, the age f America as world superpower dawned." "How did this rapid change of fortune come about? Peter Clarke's book is the first to explore the abrupt transition from Rule Britannia to Pax Americana. He shows how Roosevelt and his successors were determined that Britain must be sustained both during the war and after, but that the British Empire must not; and how the tension between Allied war aims, suppressed while the fighting was going on, became rapidly apparent when it ended. His swiftly paced narrative draws on letters, diaries, and a host of other primary sources to put us vividly in the presence of the figures around whom history pivoted: Churchill, Gandhi, Roosevelt, Stalin, Truman, and other, lesser-known individuals, through whom Clarke shows the human dimension of epochal events."--Jacket.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Great Britain so exhausted herself in the effort to halt Germany and later Japan during and after WW II that the nation became increasingly dependent on the US, which had far greater military and economic resources. Clarke (ret., Cambridge) masterfully uses the diaries of the military, political, and economic advisers surrounding Churchill and Roosevelt, and later Attlee and Truman, to show how decisions were reached and how the participants' personalities, and in some instances health, came into play. The author also effectively utilizes the coverage and reaction of British and US newspapers to gauge public perception of important negotiations between the two governments. From 1944 to 1948, an economically spent Britain found it had no choice but to relinquish its claims to India (the key to its empire) and to Palestine and to forgo its protection of Greece. This book is a splendid read about great people who were all too human. Clarke is not as critical of Churchill's effort as is John Charmley in Churchill's Grand Alliance (1995), and he sees the economic problems facing Britain quite differently from Correlli Barnett in The Lost Victory: British Dreams and British Realities, 1945-1950 (1995). Summing Up: Highly recommended. All levels/libraries. L. J. Satre emeritus, Youngstown State University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>Peter Clarke was professor of of modern British history and master of Trinity Hall, Cambridge. He is the author of the final volume in the Penguin History of Britain, Hope and Glory, Britain 1900-2000 . His other books include The Keynesian Revolution in the Making, 1924-1936 .</p>

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