The master plan : Himmler's scholars and the Holocaust / Heather Pringle.

By: Pringle, Heather Anne, 1952-Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Hyperion, c2006Edition: 1st edDescription: xii, 463 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cmISBN: 0786868864; 9780786868865 (hardcover); 0786887737; 9780786887736Subject(s): Himmler, Heinrich, 1900-1945 | Ahnenerbe (Institute) -- History | Nazis -- Germany -- Biography | National socialism and intellectuals | Eugenics -- Germany -- History -- 20th century | Holocaust, Jewish (1939-1945) | National socialism -- Philosophy | Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiter-Partei. Schutzstaffel. Rasse- und Siedlungshauptamt | Racism -- Germany -- History -- 20th century | Physical anthropology -- Germany -- History -- 20th centuryAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Master plan.DDC classification: 323.143/09/043 LOC classification: DD247.H46 | P75 2006Other classification: 8,1 | NQ 2280 | e 124 | e 174 | n 90
Contents:
Foreign affairs -- The reader -- Aryans -- Death's-head -- Making stones speak -- Finding religion -- Enchantment -- The Orientalist -- Intelligence operations -- Cro-Magnon -- The blossoming -- To the Himalayas -- Tibet -- In Siever's office -- Thieves -- The treasure of Kerch -- Lords of the manor -- Searching for the Star of David -- The skeleton collection -- Refuge -- Thor's hammer -- Nuremberg -- Secrets -- Shadows of history.
Summary: In 1935, Heinrich Himmler established a Nazi research institute called The Ahnenerbe, whose mission was to search around the world for proof of ancient Aryan conquests. But history was not their most important focus--rather, the Ahnenerbe was an essential part of the plan for the Final Solution. The findings were used to convince armies of SS men that they were entitled to slaughter Jews and other groups. Himmler also hoped to use the research as a blueprint for the breeding of a new Europe in a racially purer mold. This book, based on original research, including previously ignored archival material and interviews with living members of the institute, is an exposé of the work of German scientists and scholars who allowed their research to be warped to justify extermination, and who directly participated in the slaughter--many of whom resumed their academic positions at war's end.--From publisher description.
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Book University of Texas At Tyler
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DD247 .H46 P75 2006 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001882059

Includes bibliographical references (p. 423-446) and index.

In 1935, Heinrich Himmler established a Nazi research institute called The Ahnenerbe, whose mission was to search around the world for proof of ancient Aryan conquests. But history was not their most important focus--rather, the Ahnenerbe was an essential part of the plan for the Final Solution. The findings were used to convince armies of SS men that they were entitled to slaughter Jews and other groups. Himmler also hoped to use the research as a blueprint for the breeding of a new Europe in a racially purer mold. This book, based on original research, including previously ignored archival material and interviews with living members of the institute, is an exposé of the work of German scientists and scholars who allowed their research to be warped to justify extermination, and who directly participated in the slaughter--many of whom resumed their academic positions at war's end.--From publisher description.

Foreign affairs -- The reader -- Aryans -- Death's-head -- Making stones speak -- Finding religion -- Enchantment -- The Orientalist -- Intelligence operations -- Cro-Magnon -- The blossoming -- To the Himalayas -- Tibet -- In Siever's office -- Thieves -- The treasure of Kerch -- Lords of the manor -- Searching for the Star of David -- The skeleton collection -- Refuge -- Thor's hammer -- Nuremberg -- Secrets -- Shadows of history.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Pringle's well-researched, seamlessly written history of the Ahnenerbe, Heinrich Himmler's posh interdisciplinary Berlin research institute, is an important addition to the scholarship on the role of science in shaping the ideological and intellectual foundations of the Third Reich and ultimately the Holocaust. In 1935, Himmler established the Ahnenerbe, a think tank to document Germany's allegedly rich prehistoric Aryan past and to disseminate the fruits of its research on the "master race" broadly throughout the Reich. "In reality, however," Pringle argues, "the elite organization was in the business of mythmaking. Its prominent researchers devoted themselves to distorting the truth and churning out carefully tailored evidence to support the racial ideas of Adolph Hitler." Pringle's achievement is her unveiling of the Ahnenerbe's foreign research--its eight expeditions across Europe and Asia. Himmler hoped to apply the findings of Ahnenerbe researchers in rebreeding a pure Aryan stock. Inhabitants of former Aryan territories would have to be removed or enslaved; all Jews would have to be exterminated. Himmler's researchers traversed Sweden, Finland, France, Croatia, Serbia, Iraq, and Tibet for evidence of Aryan supremacy. After 1939, Ahnenerbe scientists conducted "applied" research, looting museums and identifying Jews for slaughter. ^BSumming Up: Indispensable for all collections. J. D. Smith University of North Carolina at Charlotte

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Heather Pringle is the author of The Mummy Congress. Her work as a journalist has appeared in Science, Geo, New Scientist, and Discover, where she is currently a contributing editor. She has lectured across the United States and Canada--from the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C., to the Canadian Museum of Civilization in Ottawa. She lives in British Columbia.

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