Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Restless giant : the United States from Watergate to Bush v. Gore / James T. Patterson.

By: Patterson, James T.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Oxford history of the United States (Unnumbered): Publisher: New York : Oxford University Press, c2005Description: xiii, 448 p. : ill., maps ; 25 cm.ISBN: 9780195122169 (alk. paper); 019512216X (alk. paper); 0195305221; 9780195305227.Subject(s): United States -- History -- 1969-DDC classification: 973.92 Other classification: 15.85
Contents:
The troubled 1970's -- Sex, families, stagflation -- The political world of the mid-1970s -- Carter, Reagan, and the rise of the right -- "Morning again in America" -- America and the world in the 1980's -- Bush 41 -- "Culture wars" and "decline" in the 1990's -- Immigration, multiculturalism, race -- Political wars of the early Clinton years -- Prosperity, partisanship, terrorism -- Impeachment and electoral crisis, 1998-2000.
Summary: A concise assessment of the 27 years between the resignation of Richard Nixon and the election of George W. Bush, weaving together social, cultural, political, economic, and international developments. We meet the era's many memorable figures--most notably, Ronald Reagan and Bill Clinton--and explore the "culture wars" where liberals and conservatives appeared to cut the country in two. Patterson describes how, when the Cold War finally ended, Americans faced bewildering new developments around the world. In exploring a wide range of cultural, social, and economic concerns, he shows how the persistence of racial tensions, high divorce rates, alarm over crime, and urban decay all led many writers to portray this era as one of decline. But he argues that our often unmet expectations caused many of us to view the era negatively, when in fact we were in many ways better off than we thought.--From publisher description.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Fiction notes: Click to open in new window
Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E839 .P38 2005 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001885367

Includes bibliographical references and index.

The troubled 1970's -- Sex, families, stagflation -- The political world of the mid-1970s -- Carter, Reagan, and the rise of the right -- "Morning again in America" -- America and the world in the 1980's -- Bush 41 -- "Culture wars" and "decline" in the 1990's -- Immigration, multiculturalism, race -- Political wars of the early Clinton years -- Prosperity, partisanship, terrorism -- Impeachment and electoral crisis, 1998-2000.

A concise assessment of the 27 years between the resignation of Richard Nixon and the election of George W. Bush, weaving together social, cultural, political, economic, and international developments. We meet the era's many memorable figures--most notably, Ronald Reagan and Bill Clinton--and explore the "culture wars" where liberals and conservatives appeared to cut the country in two. Patterson describes how, when the Cold War finally ended, Americans faced bewildering new developments around the world. In exploring a wide range of cultural, social, and economic concerns, he shows how the persistence of racial tensions, high divorce rates, alarm over crime, and urban decay all led many writers to portray this era as one of decline. But he argues that our often unmet expectations caused many of us to view the era negatively, when in fact we were in many ways better off than we thought.--From publisher description.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Continuing where he ended his prior contribution to the series (Grand Expectations: The United States, 1945-1974), Patterson (history, Brown Univ.) again combines narrative and analysis in his assessment of an important era in U.S. history. The result is a good survey of the political, economic, foreign policy, social, and cultural trends and events during the presidencies of Ford, Carter, Reagan, Bush, and Clinton. Naturally, as the book approaches its end, Patterson is brushing up so close to the present that his history turns to mere summary-always a problem when writing near to the time period. Had David Kennedy written Freedom from Fear: The American People in Depression and War, 1929-1945-his contribution to Oxford's notable multivolume series-in 1950 instead of 1999, it would likely have been forgotten instead of earning a Pulitzer Prize. Nonetheless, Patterson is a fine historian, and even his summary is as good as we are liable to get until distance gives later historians the space they will need to begin work on the more recent years covered here. For all libraries.-Robert F. Nardini, Chichester, NH (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

James T. Patterson is an American historian, and Ford Foundation Professor of History emeritus at Brown University. He wrote "Grand Expectations: the United States, 1945-1974," which received the 1997 Bancroft Prize in American history. (The Bancroft prize is one of the most prestigious honors a book of history can received and was established at Columbia University in 1948. It's considered to be on par with the Pulitzer Prize because an anonymous jury of peers judges it.) "Grand Expectations" is an interpretation of the explosive growth, high expectations and unusual optimism that Americans experienced after World War II that went into the 1960's. It follows the social, economic and cultural trends, and foreign policy issues, which became less optimistic after the assassinations, the Vietnam War and Watergate. <p> (Bowker Author Biography)

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.