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Beyond the Alamo : forging Mexican ethnicity in San Antonio, 1821-1861 / Raúl A. Ramos.

By: Ramos, Raúl A.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Chapel Hill : Published in association with the William P. Clements Center for Southwest Studies, Southern Methodist University, by the University of North Carolina Press, c2008Description: xiii, 297 p. : ill., maps ; 25 cm.ISBN: 9780807832073 (cloth : alk. paper); 0807832073 (cloth : alk. paper); 9780807871249 (pbk.); 0807871249 (pbk.).Subject(s): Mexican Americans -- Texas -- San Antonio -- Ethnic identity | Mexican Americans -- Texas -- San Antonio -- History -- 19th century | Mexican Americans -- Cultural assimilation -- Texas -- San Antonio | San Antonio (Tex.) -- Ethnic relations -- History -- 19th century | San Antonio (Tex.) -- History -- 19th centuryAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Beyond the Alamo.; Online version:: Beyond the Alamo.DDC classification: 305.868/72076435109034
Contents:
Introduction: Forging Identity in the Borderlands: Situating San Antonio de Bexar Prologue: Life in a Norteno Town Three Worlds In 1821 -- Becoming Tejano -- Conclusion: Challenging Identities: Transnational Becomes Local
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
F394 .S2119 M5163 2008 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001885375

Includes bibliographical references (p. [239]-279) and index.

Introduction: Forging Identity in the Borderlands: Situating San Antonio de Bexar 1 -- Prologue: Life in a Norteno Town 15 -- Part I Three Worlds In 1821 -- Part II Becoming Tejano -- Conclusion: Challenging Identities: Transnational Becomes Local 231.

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CHOICE Review

In this work, which fits comfortably into the categories of new history and new western history, Ramos (Univ. of Houston) departs from the more traditional Lone Star accounts usually drafted by white male historians who paid little attention to indigenous peoples. John Waynesque characters won't be found in these pages; Ramos makes clear that a culture existed in what now is San Antonio in the early 18th century. Knowing the history of these Tejanos "fits in the larger narratives of Spanish frontier settlement" that are often omitted in histories that stress English colonization along the east coast and westward expansion into a region sparsely populated. Ramos sets the record straight; in traditional histories, "previous history and social development" seldom exists--a form of historical "myopia." Writing from the transnational /ethnic studies perspective, Ramos succeeds in "bringing contemporary insight and relevance to the study of the past" and Texas history. Also see Sterling Evans's transnational study, Bound in Twine: The History and Ecology of the Henequen-Wheat Complex for Mexico and the American and Canadian Plains, 1880-1950 (2007). Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. P. D. Travis Texas Woman's University

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