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Why geography matters : three challenges facing America : climate change, the rise of China, and global terrorism / H.J. de Blij.

By: De Blij, Harm J.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York, N.Y. : Oxford University Press, 2007, c2005Description: xii, 308 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.ISBN: 9780195315820 (pbk.); 0195315820 (pbk.); 9780195183016; 0195183010.Subject(s): Human geography -- United States -- History -- 21st century | Terrorism -- History -- 21st century | Climatic changes -- History -- 21st century | China -- Politics and government -- 2002- | United States -- Politics and government -- 2001-2009 | United States -- Social conditions -- 21st centuryDDC classification: 909.83
Contents:
Why geography matters -- Reading maps and facing threats -- Earth's changeable environments -- Climate and civilization -- A future geography of human population -- The mesh of civilizations -- Red star rising: China's geopolitical gauntlet -- Terrorism's widening circle -- From terrorism to insurgency -- European superpower? -- Russia: trouble on the Eastern front -- Hope for Africa?
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
GF503 .D4 2007 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001887520

Includes bibliographical references (p. 283-286) and index.

Why geography matters -- Reading maps and facing threats -- Earth's changeable environments -- Climate and civilization -- A future geography of human population -- The mesh of civilizations -- Red star rising: China's geopolitical gauntlet -- Terrorism's widening circle -- From terrorism to insurgency -- European superpower? -- Russia: trouble on the Eastern front -- Hope for Africa?

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

This is a generally well-written account of what De Blij (geography, Michigan State Univ.) considers to be the challenges facing America today. In his opinion, many of the difficulties for America and its foreign policy stem from geographical illiteracy. Although the educator in this reviewer shares this concern, De Blij's argument is flawed. He thinks that the cause of this illiteracy is the late-20th-century public school shift from strict geography to a more broad-based social studies curriculum. The difficulty is that the bulk of the book, which succeeds in demonstrating the importance of geography, covers the type of issues that one would see in a typical social studies curriculum (global warming, the rise of China, and Islamist terrorism) rather than old-fashioned geography classes, which generally relied on rote memorization as their methodology. If De Blij had simply written that portion of the book, it would be a valuable resource for lay readers or nongeography undergraduates. Adding the polemic of the preface and first two chapters detracts from this. That portion would have been better reserved for an article in a popular newspaper or magazine, not the beginning of this book. ^BSumming Up: Optional. General readers; lower-division undergraduates; two-year technical program students. B. Mitchell Gibbs College of Boston

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Harm de Blij is John A. Hannah Professor of Geography at Michigan State University

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