Dust to eat : drought and depression in the 1930's / Michael L. Cooper.

By: Cooper, Michael L, 1950-Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Clarion Books, c2004Description: xi, 81 p. : ill. ; 24 cmISBN: 0618154493; 9780618154494Subject(s): United States -- History -- 1919-1933 -- Juvenile literature | United States -- History -- 1933-1945 -- Juvenile literature | Depressions -- 1929 -- United States -- Juvenile literature | Droughts -- Great Plains -- History -- 20th century -- Juvenile literature | Dust storms -- Great Plains -- History -- 20th century -- Juvenile literature | Migrant labor -- California -- History -- 20th century -- Juvenile literature | New Deal, 1933-1939 -- Juvenile literatureDDC classification: 973.917 LOC classification: E806 | .C63 2004
Contents:
The "Okie" problem -- The dirty thirties -- "Dust to eat, dust to breathe, dust to drink" -- California-bound -- Harvest gypsies -- Crisis in the valley -- World War II ends the Depression.
Awards: Notable Social Studies Trade Books for Young People, 2005Summary: The 1930s in America will always be remembered for twin disasters-the Great Depression and the Dust Bowl. Michael L. Cooper takes readers through this tumultuous period, beginning with the 1929 stock market crash that ushered in the Great Depression and continuing with the severe drought in the Midwest, known as the Dust Bowl. He chronicles the everyday struggle for survival by those who lost everything, as well as the mass exodus westward to California on fabled Route 66. The crisis also served as a turning point in American domestic policy, prompting the establishment of programs, such as welfare and Social Security, that revolutionized the role of the federal government. Vivid personal anecdotes from figures such as John Steinbeck and Woody Guthrie, and an extensive selection of photographs by Dorothea Lange and others, illuminate the individuals who faced poverty, illness, and despair as they coped with this extraordinary challenge. Endnotes, bibliography, Internet resources, index.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
CML Dewey University of Texas At Tyler
CML Dewey Area
973.917 C7773DU (Browse shelf) Available 0000001888510

Includes bibliographical references (p. 75-76) and index.

The "Okie" problem -- The dirty thirties -- "Dust to eat, dust to breathe, dust to drink" -- California-bound -- Harvest gypsies -- Crisis in the valley -- World War II ends the Depression.

The 1930s in America will always be remembered for twin disasters-the Great Depression and the Dust Bowl. Michael L. Cooper takes readers through this tumultuous period, beginning with the 1929 stock market crash that ushered in the Great Depression and continuing with the severe drought in the Midwest, known as the Dust Bowl. He chronicles the everyday struggle for survival by those who lost everything, as well as the mass exodus westward to California on fabled Route 66. The crisis also served as a turning point in American domestic policy, prompting the establishment of programs, such as welfare and Social Security, that revolutionized the role of the federal government. Vivid personal anecdotes from figures such as John Steinbeck and Woody Guthrie, and an extensive selection of photographs by Dorothea Lange and others, illuminate the individuals who faced poverty, illness, and despair as they coped with this extraordinary challenge. Endnotes, bibliography, Internet resources, index.

Notable Social Studies Trade Books for Young People, 2005

Reviews provided by Syndetics

School Library Journal Review

Gr 4-7-Despite its descriptions of dust and drought, this book is anything but dry. While it includes background information on the Great Depression and the Roosevelt administration's response, the text's strength is the very human face it puts on the overwhelming tragedy of the Dust Bowl years. The flowing narrative draws deeply from letters by and interviews with those who lived through this disastrous period, as well as from the work of John Steinbeck and Woody Guthrie. Cooper focuses on the physical struggle to survive, describing the harsh conditions in migrant camps, especially for the children who worked alongside their parents in the fields and often died of disease and malnutrition. The author follows the exodus from the Great Plains to California along Route 66, lacing the narrative with poems and song lyrics from the era. Of particular interest is his discussion of the grassroots effort on the part of native Californians to force the migrants to return to their home states. Archival black-and-white photographs, many taken by Dorothea Lange, grace most pages and illustrate the desperation and despair of the "Okies." Well-documented source notes are provided for each chapter. A good companion work is Jerry Stanley's poignant Children of the Dust Bowl (Random, 1992).-Joyce Adams Burner, Hillcrest Library, Prairie Village, KS (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Michael L. Cooper has written books on various aspects of American history for young adults, including a companion book, Fighting for Honor: Japanese Americans and World War II, which was named a 2002 Best Book for Young Adults.

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