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The forbidden schoolhouse : the true and dramatic story of Prudence Crandall and her students. / Suzanne Jurmain.

By: Jurmain, Suzanne.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Boston : Houghton Mifflin, 2005Description: 150 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 0618473025 (hardcover); 9780618473021 (hardcover).Subject(s): Crandall, Prudence, 1803-1890 -- Juvenile literature | Women educators -- Connecticut -- Biography -- Juvenile literature | African American women -- Education -- Connecticut -- History -- Juvenile literatureDDC classification: 370/.92 | B Other classification: 5,3 | DD 9900
Contents:
Little more learning -- School may sink -- Six scholars -- Moses had a black wife -- Will not you...be my attorney? -- Man of Canterbury....Hear me! -- Miss Crandall has commenced her school -- Unjust...and disgraceful -- Savage barbarity -- Under attack -- Miss Crandall on trial -- More Trouble -- Fire! -- Choicest blessing -- For sale -- Deep convictions of right -- Epilogue -- Appendix -- Notes -- Bibliography -- Index.
Awards: Booklist Starred Review (2005); American Library Association Young Adult Library Services Association--YALSA--Best Books for Young Adults (2006); Americna Library Association-YA (2006); American Library Association Notables (2006); Obis Pictus Honor for Outstanding Nonfiction for Children (2006).Summary: They threw rocks and rotten eggs at the school windows. Villagers refused to sell Miss Crandall groceries or let her students attend the town church. Mysteriously, her schoolhouse was set on fire-by whom and how remains a mystery. The town authorities dragged her to jail and put her on trial for breaking the law. Her crime? Trying to teach African American girls geography, history, reading, philosophy, and chemistry. Trying to open and maintain one of the first African American schools in America. Exciting and eye-opening, this account of the heroine of Canterbury, Connecticut, and her elegant white schoolhouse at the center of town will give readers a glimpse of what it is like to try to change the world when few agree with you.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
CML Dewey University of Texas At Tyler
CML Dewey Area
370.92 J958FO (Browse shelf) Available 0000001888684

Includes bibliographical references (p. [138]-144) and index.

Little more learning -- School may sink -- Six scholars -- Moses had a black wife -- Will not you...be my attorney? -- Man of Canterbury....Hear me! -- Miss Crandall has commenced her school -- Unjust...and disgraceful -- Savage barbarity -- Under attack -- Miss Crandall on trial -- More Trouble -- Fire! -- Choicest blessing -- For sale -- Deep convictions of right -- Epilogue -- Appendix -- Notes -- Bibliography -- Index.

They threw rocks and rotten eggs at the school windows. Villagers refused to sell Miss Crandall groceries or let her students attend the town church. Mysteriously, her schoolhouse was set on fire-by whom and how remains a mystery. The town authorities dragged her to jail and put her on trial for breaking the law. Her crime? Trying to teach African American girls geography, history, reading, philosophy, and chemistry. Trying to open and maintain one of the first African American schools in America. Exciting and eye-opening, this account of the heroine of Canterbury, Connecticut, and her elegant white schoolhouse at the center of town will give readers a glimpse of what it is like to try to change the world when few agree with you.

Booklist Starred Review (2005); American Library Association Young Adult Library Services Association--YALSA--Best Books for Young Adults (2006); Americna Library Association-YA (2006); American Library Association Notables (2006); Obis Pictus Honor for Outstanding Nonfiction for Children (2006).

Reviews provided by Syndetics

School Library Journal Review

Gr 7-9-Jurmain describes the difficulties Crandall faced when she decided to open a school for African-American females in Canterbury, CT. Although she had the support of William Lloyd Garrison, editor of the antislavery publication the Liberator; Reverend Samuel May, a Unitarian minister; and others, her hard work met resistance in the form of riots, arson, and a jail sentence. Black-and-white photos highlight the key players and the famed schoolhouse. The appendix lists the courageous students who attended the school along with a few facts about them, including how their futures played out after the institution was forced to close. This book offers a fresh look at the climate of education for African Americans and women in the early 1800s. Report writers and recreational readers alike will find it informative.-Kelly Czarnecki, Bloomington Public Library, IL (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Suzanne Tripp Jurmain was born into a theatrical family, making her acting debut at age four and appearing in a number of television programs during her childhood and teen years. After earning an honors degree in English at UCLA, she worked at UCLA's Fowler Museum before becoming a freelance writer. She has published several award-winning books for children on historical subjects, including The Secret of the Yellow Death, and the picture books Worst of Friends: Thomas Jefferson, John Adams and the True Story of an American Feud, George Did It, and Nice Work, Franklin!, all illustrated by Larry Day. Suzanne Jurmain lives with her husband in Los Angeles. Visit her website at www.suzannejurmain.com .<br>

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