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The southern diaspora : how the great migrations of Black and White Southerners transformed America / James N. Gregory.

By: Gregory, James N. (James Noble).
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, c2005Description: xiv, 446 p. : ill., maps ; 25 cm.ISBN: 0807829838 (cloth : alk. paper); 9780807829837 (cloth : alk. paper); 0807856517 (pbk. : alk. paper); 9780807856512 (pbk. : alk. paper).Subject(s): Migration, Internal -- Southern States -- History -- 20th century | Migration, Internal -- United States -- History -- 20th century | African Americans -- Migrations -- History -- 20th century | United States -- Population -- History -- 20th centuryAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Southern diaspora.DDC classification: 304.8/0975 Other classification: 74.94 | 15.85
Contents:
A century of migration -- Migration stories -- Success and failure -- The Black metropolis -- Uptown and beyond -- Gospel highways -- Leveraging civil rights -- Re-figuring conservatism -- Great migrations.
Summary: Includes information on the auto industry, Baptist church, black metropolis, black migrants, California, Catholic church, Chicago, Cleveland (Ohio), Democratic Party, Detroit (Michigan), Education, employment, films, Harlem, Harlem Renaissance, Hispanics, Illinois, income, Indiana, integration, intelligentsia, Jews, literature, Los Angeles (California), Michigan, music, National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), New York City, Ohio, Pentacostal church, politics and civil rights, race riots, racism, radio, religion, Republican Party, San Francisco (California), segregation, unions, voting, white migrants, Amos 'n Andy, etc.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
HB1971 .G74 2005 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001890102

Includes bibliographical references (p. [359]-426) and index.

A century of migration -- Migration stories -- Success and failure -- The Black metropolis -- Uptown and beyond -- Gospel highways -- Leveraging civil rights -- Re-figuring conservatism -- Great migrations.

Includes information on the auto industry, Baptist church, black metropolis, black migrants, California, Catholic church, Chicago, Cleveland (Ohio), Democratic Party, Detroit (Michigan), Education, employment, films, Harlem, Harlem Renaissance, Hispanics, Illinois, income, Indiana, integration, intelligentsia, Jews, literature, Los Angeles (California), Michigan, music, National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), New York City, Ohio, Pentacostal church, politics and civil rights, race riots, racism, radio, religion, Republican Party, San Francisco (California), segregation, unions, voting, white migrants, Amos 'n Andy, etc.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Gregory (Univ. of Washington) has combined the story of African Americans leaving the South with new evidence of southern white migrants and their impact in the North. Blacks used their consolidated living area and institutions to gain a powerful leverage to create cultural and political change. White migrants included elite intellectuals who advocated black rights, and working-class whites who mostly did not. The latter settled throughout the cities, and this diffusion limited their influence until they combined with working-class ethnics on the issues of patriotism and the values of "plain folks" in support of George Wallace in the politics of the 1960s-70s. Southern Baptists joined Holiness and Pentecostal churches in opposition to gay rights, sex education, and abortion, and thus the Silent Majority became the Moral Majority. The new movement was racial, but not in the manner of the Ku Klux Klan, race riots, or hate strikes. School integration, housing, and jobs were its issues, and those of northern Catholics. This coalition would have amazed the Christian Right of the 1920s. Gregory makes it abundantly clear that the migration story of the 20th century is far more complex than has been thought. Compare with Nicholas Lemann's The Promised Land (CH, Sep'91, 29-0523). Summing Up: Highly recommended. All levels/libraries. L. H. Grothaus emeritus, Concordia University

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